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It pays to be a Novell exec

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SUSE
Misc

Last time, I promised I'd make a recommendation for one area in which Novell could really save a dollar or two. But before getting into that, there's one more area of the financial statements and the speeches and press releases surrounding them that I want to bring up - the "success" of SuSE Linux.

According to the press release, "During the fourth fiscal quarter 2005, Novell recognized Linux platform revenue of $61 million, which was up 418 percent from the year ago quarter." Sounds impressive, doesn't it? But the release goes on to explain that, "Linux platform revenue included $46 million from sales of Open Enterprise Server (OES) and $15 million of revenue from other Linux products and services."

So existing NetWare customers who upgraded to OES and are running it on a NetWare kernel are still being counted as Linux customers! I've mentioned this before, but now I really want to find out - if you are running OES why did you buy it - was it so that you could run NetWare services on Linux, so you could stay up-to-date on NetWare servers, or some other reason? And which kernel are you running your servers on? Drop a note to me at dkearns@vquill.com and put OES in the subject line.

Now, about saving money for Novell.

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