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Kororaa - Revisited

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Almost a month ago I attempted an install of Gentoo using Kororaa and it didn't quite go as hoped. About a week ago Chris, of Kororaa, writes to mention that he released Beta2-r1. He stated that he was finally able to find a machine that would reproduce my error and thought he had fixed it. He asked if I could test it, and I apologize for the delay, but today I finally did. What happened this time?

Success! Yes! It went like clockwork and I am so pleased. If you read the former article mentioned above, you will get a rough rundown of the installation process. Only this time instead of the package installation prematurely exiting, we had a successfull install of 390 packages out of 390.

Upon boot we are presented with a similar setup screen as described previously, save for the prelink step. I've played around with prelink myself several times and have had mixed results. I'm not a true believer in prelinking anyway, so I didn't miss that step. The other steps went very well. Most hardware was automagically detected and setup, or setup during this step. Configuration files were written for most of the tedious tasks and a bootable gui resulted.

I'm just tickled pink. I finally have a nice fresh gentoo install, and all without the pains of reading the exhaustive documentation contained in the gentoo handbook. Not that I'm advocating skipping the documentation, it's just that I've been thru it about a 1/2 dozen times now and though not all of the install has been put to memory, most of the post-install configurations have. So, if you have never installed Gentoo before and even if you choose Kororaa as your install method, please read through the documentation for proper setup of your system.

As stated Kororaa sets up quite a bit of the little config files needed to get into your system. During the install phase you are asked for your root password and user setup. After boot the systemconfig sets up your sound, network and asks your resolution, but no xorg.conf file was written. I should have tried to see if X would start, but without a proper config file, I assumed it wouldn't. So, I took the route of /usr/X11R6/bin/xorgconfig to get a basic config written. Then I tested using the vesa drivers. Afterwhich I exited X and installed the nVidia drivers. From there I edited a few things in xorg.conf, modprobe nvidia, and was able to start x into KDE using nvidia graphic drivers. After reboot kdm started for a graphical login.

KDE is version 3.5 and it is wonderfully stable. It even includes support for xinerama. I first began desiring a fresh Gentoo install due to the ever-growing size of my current install. I deleted the usual recommended directories and uninstalled this and that, however, I still could not get it below 6.5 gigs. Then lately, I have to admit, things have become a little unstable. I had poked and prodded, installed and uninstalled, deleted this directory and that file, tweaked and config'd, updated and patched kernels, installed some things from source and other's from ebuilds, all under almost borderline insane c & ldflags and unstable arch, the point that I had a mess. I was beginning to suffer crashes. I had begun to blame hardware, cuz I sure couldn't blame my beloved Gentoo or (heaven forbid) myself! Big Grin

Kororaa comes with some great compromises (good general all around default config for a majority of users I mean) in its make.conf. It is compiled using march=pentium3 and chost i686-pc-linux-gnu. It has as its default cflags "-pipe -O3 -fweb -frename-registers -fforce-addr -momit-leaf-frame-pointer -fomit-frame-pointer -ftracer" and ldflags of " -Wl,-O2 -Wl,--enable-new-dtags -Wl,--sort-common -s." This is all using the arch of x86 (which means stable). I might be changing my march to athlon-xp, but I'll probably leave the rest. I'll think I'll stay in the stable branch from now on, or at least for now. I might need to add to the USE flags as well, but basically I'm satisfied with this setup.

Kororaa comes with a Linux-2.6.14 kernel unamed 2.6.14-kororaa-r6. It utilized gcc 3.4.4 and Xorg 6.8.2. It also comes with mozilla-firebird/thunderbird 1.0.7, openoffice 2.0.0, and gimp 2.2.8-r1. Besides KDE, the default install includes fluxbox-0.9.14-r1 as well. Once you sync up you can install anything from portage just as any other Gentoo install. In fact if you change the USE flags very much in your /etc/make.conf, you should emerge --newuse world before adding to the default packages. If you change the march or other cflags, perhaps you should emerge -e world. Don't change the chost. (Consult the documentation for definitive answers/advice in this area please.)

As you can see from the following screenshot, Kororaa comes to you fairly up-to-date. There are but a handful of apps that have been updated since Kororaa has been released.

Well, sorry to cut this short, but I do have a new system to tweak and make pretty. Big Grin Kororaa is a wonderful shortcut and I am very pleased with the results. Good job Chris and thanks for everything. Woohoooo!...

Kororaa Home Page.
Download Page.
Documentation Handbook.

Linux Training UK.

xorg.conf issue

I think was due to lspci not being in the right place. This is easily fixed and a howto is on the forums.

I'd like to know for sure though, cause on all my tests xorg.conf was created just fine Thinking


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