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Fedora 12: A little *too* convenient.

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Linux

Fedora, and Redhat before it, has held a special place in my heart for years, being that Redhat Desktop was the very first Linux distribution I ever used, and the one I kept coming back to during my programming classes in college.

We've been estranged in recent years since I was seduced by the Debian-like crowd, and a spotty release record hasn't helped me regain my confidence. In fact, so unimpressed was I with release 10 that I completely ignored release 11 (a fact that I just now noticed).

Hopefully this version will make a more memorable impression. I downloaded the GNOME live CD for my initial run-through.

Install:

The dueling scrollbars from previous releases are still here. The actual installer window looks about the same as its ancestors as well. I don't mind sticking with something that works, but I'm a little surprised. Fedora generally likes to give everything a fresh facelift with each release.

Rest Here

Also: Fedora 12 rolls out impressive features




Nothing new?

ThechieMoe is ThechieMoe and has strong opinions based on a quite narrow list of demands. I would however expect him to make better research than this:

"Generally the Fedora crew tend to surge forward with new and interesting things with little regard to little details like stability, but aside from the "anyone can install anything" feature I didn't see much of interest in this release."

Fedora isn't LinuxMint or something like that, so if he doesn't care to learn about quite amazing advancements in virtualization, then he probably shouldn't rant about it. I don't use Fedora but I'm still amazed at how some reviews seem to totally get off target.

re: nothing new?

The problem is that reviewers are people and they are interested in what they're interested in. It's a bit different for folks who get paid to write reviews, but it's still there.

For example, I just finished a little blurb on fedora and didn't mention virtualization once. I was rather taken by all the X stuff myself. But I did end it with something like "this is just a handful of the new features..."

virtualization is like cloud computing to me: in one ear and out the other. just not something I'm interested in. I rarely mention it in any review/article/blog/comment/postcard/smokesignal...

He's every right to publish

He's every right to publish whatever he likes. I've been defending him in the past, and that when he really trashed the distro of my choice. I defended and will defend him because it's his right to not like something.

In this case I'm not attacking him either, even though it looks that way. My reason for disputing his claim was because I think it's fair to do so. Virtualization was just one example of why some would find that there are many new features in Fedora this time as well. That said it's of course more interesting to read something that takes into account the purpose of use for a distro.

Sure everyone writes from his/hers own perspective... and that includes me.

Techiemoe just want's to play games.

Techiemoe just want's to play games.

re: Techiemoe just want's to play games

well, I been there! Big Grin

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