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Taking KDE 3.5 for a ride with SUSE

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KDE
SUSE
HowTos

If you're like a lot of KDE users, you probably want to give the latest and greatest version of the popular Linux desktop environment a try. However, if you're like a lot of newer users, you're also not quite sure how to go about upgrading your desktop.

Fortunately, if you're a SUSE user, you're in luck. Not only does SUSE make it easy in general to upgrade programs with its YaST system administration program, SUSE is one of the few distributions for which there are already pre-complied binary packages so you don't need to compile the desktop yourself.

For SUSE, in particular, KDE 3.5 binaries are available for SUSE 9.1 and higher.

Next, I needed to find a complete set of the KDE 3.5 binaries. While I could just grab the dozens of SUSE RPMs themselves from any of the many KDE 3.5 mirror sites, life is too short for that. Instead, I used YaST for the job.

Full Article.

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