Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Adding Your Code to the Kernel

Filed under
Linux

From their book's section on adding your own code to the kernel, the authors demonstrate how device drivers are represented in the filesystem.

Device drivers encompass the interface that the Linux kernel uses to allow the programmer to control the system's input/output devices. Entire books have been written specifically on Linux device drivers. In this chapter we attempt to distill this topic down to its essentials. We will follow a device driver from how the device is represented in the filesystem and then through the specific kernel code that controls it. We start by exploring the filesystem and show how these files tie into the kernel.

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more

DAISY: A Linux-compatible text format for the visually impaired

If you're blind or visually impaired like I am, you usually require various levels of hardware or software to do things that people who can see take for granted. One among these is specialized formats for reading print books: Braille (if you know how to read it) or specialized text formats such as DAISY. Read more

FreeBSD 11 Alpha 1 — New Features Coming To This Open Source OS

For those unfamiliar with FreeBSD, it is considered one of the few operating systems left to be true UNIX. It is a direct descendant of the BELL/AT&T labs UNIX. Much of the software available for Linux is also available for FreeBSD as well, including Gnome and KDE desktop environments and much more user and server software. Despite the amount of software available, it is often thought of as an obscure system with a rather small software library. This is simply Read more