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downtime and slow updates

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Site News

My apologizes for today's problems. The lights blinked this morning and I've been having issues since. But they seem to be resolved now.

It was so weird. After everything came back up this morning, I couldn't connect to a lot of sites. I could connect to a lot of others. The IP didn't even seem to be much of a clue. I've been fiddling with it all afternoon on and off (and minus a nap), even resorting to powering off the modem and restarting the server. I checked all the usual suspects and everything looked fine. I poked and I prodded, checked configuration files, jiggled cables, this, that, and the other... Then at some point it started working.

So, I don't know what was wrong or what finally fixed it, but I think all is well now. Sorry for the interrupt in service and the slow updating of stories. It's been a slow news day anyway and tomorrow being a holiday in the US will probably be slower. I might even go out of town as well. My family is getting rather upset at me for missing so many get togethers with them. So, the site may not be updated for a while tomorrow either.

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