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Ubuntu User On Fedora 12: Using It And Liking It

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Linux

I have been a full time Ubuntu user since 2006. Before that I tried to like it, but couldn’t. I moved to it out of necessity when MEPIS began to play around with it core, switching from Debian to Ubuntu and back in six months. It was a fun ride, but it was not what I was interested in. Ubuntu was my only viable choice. It took time for it to grow on me. In a sense we have grown together.

When the Ubuntu 9.10 alpha came out I installed it on a separate partition while using Ubuntu 9.04 on another partition as my main OS. I am active on several help forums, problem solving mostly Ubuntu and Kubuntu problems. I run Ubuntu from alpha to final. I report bugs and watch it grow into maturity with pride. I spread the word and help others with problems. I have been a faithful user in every sense of the word.

I am at the same time a Fedora resister. I began with Mandrake and lived in RPM hell for two years. Yes, RPM has matured, but I have a well established hatred of that package management system. I tried Fedora’s first few releases, but they left me cold. I have tried each release of Fedora since, but it has continued to rub me the wrong way.

Until recently.




Ubuntu and Fedora

Fedora is a point-and-click desktop, next-next installer distribution and that is what it aims to be. It is actually easier to administer than Ubuntu, it has more graphical administration tools, the video driver never fails to build upon kernel update and rpm is more streamlined than apt/dpkg these days. In Ubuntu even enabling and disabling services requires command line voodoo.

I'm currently using both Ubuntu and Fedora, the former on my laptop and the latter on the family desktop, and I have yet to decide which one I like better, they are probably pretty much equivalent, so much so that I have no motivation to format either one to switch. Canonical vs. Red Hat I'm too old to care, they are both active contributors to the open source community, each one in their own way.

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