Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

What Chrome OS has on Windows that Linux doesn’t

Filed under

Google’s Chrome OS isn’t the first operating system to challenge Microsoft Windows’ commanding lead. But it’s got an advantage that other rivals such as Linux lacked: the Web.

Any new operating system must attract the developers who produce the applications to make it useful. The trouble Windows challengers have had is matching the wide spectrum of software available for Windows already.

That software includes mainstream titles such as Microsoft Office, Quicken, Adobe Photoshop, games, but also innumerable programs for narrower niches such as genealogy. Although some people are happy if they have the handful applications they need, an operating system needs broad support to achieve mass penetration.

Canonical’s Ubuntu version of Linux has a lot of buzz as a desktop operating system, but when April 15 comes around, TurboTax doesn’t run on it. Multiply that by all software the world needs and the Windows incumbent advantage becomes clearer.

Rest Here


What advantage does Google's Chrome OS have over Linux?

Name Recognition.

Google Chrome OS - Is this the future? I would like to give a not so humble man's perspective on a new Linux-based operating system available, which you may or may not like or may or may not want to use. It's entirely up to you to love, hate or worship Google. You will have to decide whether it's good for you, whether they want to steal your data and kidneys and what you want to do with your netbook. From the purely user-istic perspective, I'll give you a conservative, layman's view on what Google Chrome OS can do.

Google Chrome OS first impressions

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Turris Omnia Is a Linux-Based Powerful Open Source Router That Updates on the Fly

Turris Omnia is a new open source router that comes with powerful hardware and a Linux distro based on OpenWRT. It’s a smashing hit on Indiegogo, and there is still time to get one. Read more

APT (Advanced Package Tool) 1.1 Is Now Stable in Debian

APT (Advanced Package Tool) is a famous set of core tools inside Debian that make it possible to install, remove, and keep applications up to date. The stable branch of APT has been finally upgraded with the version 1.3. Read more

Historians and detectives keep track of data with open source tool

Segrada is a piece of open source software that allows historians (and detectives) to keep track of their data. Unlike wikis or archival databases, its focus lies on information and interrelations within it. Pieces of information might represent persons, places, things, or concepts. These "nodes" can be bidirectionally connected with each other to semantically represent friendship, blood relation, whereabouts, authorship, and so on. Hence the term "semantic graph database," since information can be displayed as a graph of semantically connected nodes. Read more

today's leftovers