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Google and the Future of Linux

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Linux
Google

If I said Google's been getting a lot of press lately, that wouldn't mean much. Google always seems to get a lot of press. It could be my imagination, of course, but it really feels like there's been an uptick of chatter about Google these days. Motorola's Droid was released, running Google's Android OS. Google unleashed a new programming language called "Go" on the world. Then there was also the excitement over the Chrome OS that's in development. I'm pretty sure it isn't my imagination. In the midst of all this Robert Strohmeyer suggested that the future of Linux is Google. Hmmm...maybe, but I'm not so sure.

Don't get me wrong, I like Google. I like the company because I like what it offers, and I love the price tag (free!). I use gmail, YouTube and have my primary website/blog hosted through Google-owned Blogger. Come to think of it, many of Google's great products were really acquisitions.

There are some funky things about Google.




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