Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Microsoft tries to improve image among open-source developers

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Nik Garkusha is a young and friendly bloke who, in faded jeans and a plain navy blue sweater, resembles the "I'm a Mac" kid in the Apple television ads more than the staid and stuffy PC guy.

Funny thing: He's the PC guy.

Garkusha is an emissary from Microsoft Corp.'s Canadian arm whose job is to convince open-source software disciples that his company is not the evil empire it appears to be.
And he was recently in town doing a full-court press. Leaders of Montreal's several open-source groups were invited to drinks and lunches with Garkusha. One event took place in the penthouse suite at the W hotel with an open bar - not the type of event that open-source programmers, who eschew excess as a matter principle, normally frequent.

The result: They were almost convinced.




Good luck MS

HAHA good luck with that!

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

EMC to open-source ViPR - and lots of other stuff apparently

ViPR is software storage controller tech that separates the control and data planes of operation, enabling different data services to be layered onto a set of storage hardware products - such as EMC's own arrays, Vblocks, selected third-party arrays, JBODs and cloud storage. The data services are typically ways of accessing data, such as file services, The open source software will be called Project CoprHD* and be made available on GitHub for community development. It will include all the storage automation and control functionality and be supplied under the Mozilla Public License 2.0 (MPL 2.0). Public supporting partners for CoprHD are Intel, Verizon and SAP. Read more

Patent Pledges and Open Source Software Development

For all its benefits, one aspect of open source software does cause headaches: understanding the legal terms that control its development and use. For starters, scores of licenses have been created that the Open Source Initiative recognizes as meeting the definition of an “open source license.” While the percentage of these licenses that are in wide use is small, there are significant and important differences between many of these popular licenses. Moreover, determining what rights are granted in some cases requires referring to what the community thinks they mean (rather than their actual text), and in others by the context in which the license is used. Read more

Open Source History: Why Did Linux Succeed?

One of the most puzzling questions about the history of free and open source is this: Why did Linux succeed so spectacularly, whereas similar attempts to build a free or open source, Unix-like operating system kernel met with considerably less success? I don't know the answer to that question. But I have rounded up some theories, which I'd like to lay out here. Read more