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Why the BSDs get no love

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BSD

It was a warm summer night, circa 1996, when I installed my first Linux distribution. I remember it well, the old text-based installation of Caldera Open Linux. The install took some time to get used to, but it worked. But what about the BSDs?

Back in the day, I was one with the text-based installation. I could install Red Hat 4.2 in my sleep. Manual partitions? Child’s play. There was nothing I couldn’t install.

Over the weekend - I installed OpenBSD. And then I installed FreeBSD. And then I quickly realized why the BSDs are getting no love. For some odd reason the BSDs refuse to join the rest of the modern world. Instead they have decided they (the BSD communities) are going to rebel and remain in the 90s with the text-based installation and their cryptic install instructions. But then the BSD communities complains that they get no love…no press…no user-base. Oh sure the silver back geeks and the server farms will run one or more flavor of BSD (it IS insanely stable and secure). More than likely, those are the users that have been running BSD since their days in their high-school computer club.

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