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Review: Slackware 13.0

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Slack

When Slackware 13 came a few months ago on the LXF magazine, I decided to throw it into Virtualbox to see how it has changed. One difference this time around is that I now have the dual core machine so I am running Slackware on that machine.

It booted up the same as Slackware 12.2. Like last time I hit enter. It also once again asked about my keyboard and I hit enter – just like last time. Once again, you had to log in as root and prepare the hard drive partitions. Apparently none of this had changed since Slackware 12.2. Then again, most of the time the installers for other distros don’t change. (Although they do take occasional leaps like Debian) Once again, the virtual hard drive was at /dev/hda. This time I gave myself 512 MB for swap. I type setup. It looked exactly the same as before.

In my review of Slackware 12.2 I remarked that those who said that Slackware was full of outdated software were wrong. Slackware often had the latest versions of programs available at the time of its feature freeze for the current version. This is also true with file systems as Slackware 13.0 gives the option of running ext4.

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