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Dell turns to Linux for quick-boot system

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Linux

Dell announced Thursday that it's offering a memory module called Latitude On Flash that can boot up a computer in seconds as an option for some laptops. The module is available alongside the option of an existing quick-boot system that uses an Arm processor.

Dell's Latitude On Flash module snaps into an internal mini-card slot and allows computers to boot in a few seconds, using the laptop's main x86 processor instead of a separate Arm chip. The module is offered as an option for Latitude E-series systems, which can also be equipped with the existing quick-boot system, called Latitude On, that's based on an Arm-based OMAP processor from Texas Instruments.

"By running on a low-cost memory card, Latitude On Flash delivers a broad level of functionality at a significantly lower price point than the original Latitude On OMAP-based offering," wrote Lionel Menchaca, in a blog entry on Dell's Web site.

But there's one drawback.




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