Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

World's Largest Python Conference Comes to Atlanta

Filed under
OS

World's Largest Python Conference Comes to Atlanta
==================================================

*ATLANTA - December 18, 2009*

The Django Pony made her sparkly public debut. The infamous Beards of PyCon were
captured on film. Guido van Rossum announced the beginning of his gradual retirement
as Python's Benevolent Dictator for life - then kidnapped the Django Pony. Backseat
language drivers were threatened with the terribl(y silly) fate of being Van Lindberg'd.

PyCon 2009 drew nearly a thousand Python programmers from around the world, representing
projects on all seven continents - including Antarctica! They gathered for serious
learning, discussion, and strategizing... and for not-so-serious fun. PyCon 2010, the
eighth annual conference of the Python programming community, promises even more on all
counts: more talks, more education, more creativity; more work *and* more play.

Interest in PyCon is growing along with the use of the Python language itself.
This year alone has seen a 50% increase in the number of talk proposals submitted by
community members, and the organizers have added an unprecedented fifth track to the
conference schedule. The conference will include 95 regular talks and panels, covering
everything from language basics to deep-space astronomy to robotic submarines. PyCon
also offers 32 half-day tutorials, Open Space sessions, special keynotes, Lightning Talks,
development sprints, an exhibit hall, and a hands-on lab - countless opportunities for
attendees to learn. This year, PyCon also introduces poster sessions for detailed,
personal examination of a variety of topics with subject matter experts.

Python's growth has been partially driven by an explosion in new implementations of the
language. The IronPython and Jython implementations make Python a perfect tool for
.NET and Java environments, respectively, gaining full-scale use of those platforms'
existing capabilities and libraries while retaining Python's ease, elegance, and dynamism.
Other implementations, like Stackless and Google's Unladen-Swallow, focus on improving
Python execution speed. Finally, the Pynie and PyPy implementations bring Python programs
to all-new experimental execution environments. All these implementations will be examined
in several PyCon talks and in PyCon's Python Language Summit and Virtual Machine Summit.

PyCon 2010 will take place February 17 to 25 at the Hyatt Regency in Atlanta, Georgia. The
conference is organized and run by volunteer Python programmers; the users' perspective
governs everything from talk selection to conference cost, making an exceptionally
worthwhile conference. Registration is open now, and early-bird registration discounts
apply through January 6.

About Python
------------

Python is an open-source, dynamically typed, object-oriented programming language
that can be used in nearly the entire range of technology applications.
It offers an easy learning curve and access to a vast array of libraries. With
implementations available for all common operating systems as well as the Java
and .NET platforms, Python can be used on virtually any system in existence.
Python's power and versatility have made it one of the world's most popular
programming languages, currently ranked #7 in the TIOBE index. Like other
open-source, dynamic languages, it offers rapid productivity and a vigorous
developer community; at the same time, Python's clarity and reliability give
confidence to enterprise users.

About PyCon
-----------

Presented by the Python Software Foundation and sponsored by Google,
the world’s largest Python conference brings together a diverse group of
developers, enthusiasts, and organizations to explore new challenges, launch
new businesses and forge new connections within the Python community. PyCon
provides attendees with the opportunity to delve into the dynamic programming
language relied upon by institutions from MIT and NASA to Cisco and Walt
Disney. PyCon helps people learn new tools and techniques, present
their own projects, and meet other Python fans. Press passes to the conference
are available for members of the press who would like to witness PyCon in person.

PyCon: http://us.pycon.org
Python language website: http://python.org
Python Software Foundation: http://www.python.org/psf/
TIOBE Index: http://www.tiobe.com/index.php/tiobe_index,/a>

Media Contact
-------------

| Catherine Devlin
| catherine.devlin@gmail.com
| (937)286-1795

More in Tux Machines

Devices: Axiomtek, Vecow and Canonical on Robotics

  • Tiny i.MX6 UL DIN-rail computer has dual mini-PCIe slots

    Axiomtek’s compact, rugged “Agent200-FL-DC” DIN-rail computer runs Linux on a low-power i.MX6 UL. Features include 10/100 Ethernet, USB, serial, DIO, optional CAN, and 2x mini-PCIe with a SIM slot. Axiomtek has posted product details for a “coming soon” Agent200-FL-DC DIN-rail computer. Like last year’s similar IFB125 and the IFB122 from 2017, the Agent200-FL-DC is a headless gateway that runs a Yocto based Linux stack on NXP’s 528MHz Cortex-A7 based i.MX6 UltraLight (UL) SoC. This time it’s Yocto 2.4 “Rocko” running on a newer Linux kernel 4.9.88. This is the only one of the three that also supports Ubuntu 18.04 (with the same kernel), as well as Android 8.1.

  • Huge Coffee Lake Refresh system has four PCIe slots for Nvidia and AMD graphics

    Vecow’s rugged, Linux-friendly “GPC-1000” computer has 8th or 9th Gen CPUs with up to 64GB DDR4 and provides 4x PCIe slots that support dual-slot graphics.

  • Key considerations when choosing a robot?s operating system

Mesa 19.3.0 Released

  • Mesa 19.3.0 Release Notes / 2019-12-12

    Mesa 19.3.0 is a new development release. People who are concerned with stability and reliability should stick with a previous release or wait for Mesa 19.3.1. Mesa 19.3.0 implements the OpenGL 4.6 API, but the version reported by glGetString(GL_VERSION) or glGetIntegerv(GL_MAJOR_VERSION) / glGetIntegerv(GL_MINOR_VERSION) depends on the particular driver being used. Some drivers don't support all the features required in OpenGL 4.6. OpenGL 4.6 is only available if requested at context creation. Compatibility contexts may report a lower version depending on each driver. Mesa 19.3.0 implements the Vulkan 1.1 API, but the version reported by the apiVersion property of the VkPhysicalDeviceProperties struct depends on the particular driver being used.

  • Mesa 19.3 Released With Big Updates For Intel's Open-Source Drivers, Valve ACO Option

    After a few weeks worth of delays due to blocker bugs the release of Mesa 19.3 is out today as a big end-of-year upgrade to the open-source OpenGL and Vulkan drivers for Linux systems. Intel and AMD Radeon driver changes largely dominate the work as always but there is a growing number of embedded driver changes and other enhancements for this crucial piece to the open-source 3D ecosystem.

Python Programming, Rust and Puppet Enterprise 3

  • Circuit Python at PyConf Hyderabad

    Coding in/with hardware has become my biggest stress buster for me ever since I have been introduced to it in PyCon Pune 2017 by John. Coding with hardware provides a real-life interaction with the code you write. It flourishes creativity. I can do all of this while I learn something new. Now I look for auctions to offer me a chance to code in/with Hardware. It gives the chance to escape the muggle world.

  • New in testmon 1.0.0

    Significant portions of testmon have been rewritten for v 1.0.1. Although the UI is mostly the same, there are some significant differences.

  • Determining affected tests

    Automatically determining affected tests sounds too good to be true. Python developers rightfully have a suspecting attitude towards any tool which tries to be too clever about their source code. Code completion and symbol searching doesn't need to be 100% reliable but messing with the test suite execution? This page explains what testmon tries and what it does not try to achieve. [...] After running the test with coverage analysis and parsing the source code, testmon determines which blocks does test_s.py::test_add depend on. In our example it's Block 1,2 and 4. (and not Block 3). testmon doesn't store the whole code of the block but just a checksum of it. Block 3 can be changed to anything. As long as the Block 1,2 and 4 stay the same, the execution path for test_s.py::test_add and it's outcome will stay the same.

  • How to set-up and use py.test in Pycharm

    I've been using Vim and terminal as a weapon of choice for years. I've had a good time with it, however, more and more people ask me why I'm using this setup. And honestly, I don't know the answer. I'm aware that things can be done more efficiently and an IDE can help with a lot of things. I guess that my weak spot is the unit tests and testing my code in general. I'm not running my tests when on the coding spree, I'm breaking lots of stuff, and only when I think I'm finished, I'll do the fixing and make everything running green again. Well, I would like to change that. And I'm also curious about trying out new ways of doing things. The obvious choice for programming in Python is the PyCharm. It's a nice IDE, supports many features that I like and most importantly, it can help with the testing. PyCharm can easily integrate with popular test frameworks and run the tests for me.

  • This Week in Rust 316
  • Continuous Delivery for Puppet Enterprise 3.0 is now available

    I am very excited to announce the immediate availability of Continuous Delivery for Puppet Enterprise 3.0! Over the last year, we’ve taken to heart the challenges and recommendations our customers have shared with us on how we can make Continuous Delivery for Puppet Enterprise better. Our intent is to be truly customer-obsessed, meet our customers where they are, and help them get to where they want to be. This release focuses on our customers’ needs by providing more context into the impact of a proposed Puppet change by offering Hiera support for Impact Analysis, a simplified approach to defining pipelines as code, and the ability to easily compose custom deployment processes (currently in beta!). Let’s dive in!

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Ubuntu Podcast and Bad Voltage

  • 2019-12-12 | Linux Headlines

    KDE's release service has a fresh batch of updates, Electron joins the OpenJS Foundation, VirtualBox 6.1 brings nested virtualization to Intel CPUs, and Vim levels up with a fun game to showcase the release of version 8.2.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E36 – Desert Strike

    This week we’ve been making a low latency point-to-point game streaming application, discuss what it takes to create each Ubuntu distro release, bring you some command line love and go over the last of your feedback for 2019. It’s Season 12 Episode 36 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Bad Voltage 2×61: Frankly Much Smarter

    Stuart Langridge, Jono Bacon, and Jeremy Garcia present Bad Voltage, in which a tenth of a point is more important than one might think it is, Mother Shipton is turning in her grave, and: