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Evangelism is War – The Mono/Moonlight Agenda

I was going over an old Groklaw posting that got me thinking about Microsoft and it’s .NET Agenda. I decided to do more research and took a look at the Comes vs Microsoft documents again but from the perspective of the current Mono issues. After reading the information contained in the documents I am even more convinced that Mono and Moonlight do nothing but help Microsoft win against competing platforms. I will quote and comment on a few relevant sections I found useful to prove my point.

Evangelism Is War

Our mission is to establish Microsoft’s platforms as the de facto standards throughout the computer industry. Our enemies are the vendors of platforms that compete with ours: Netscape, Sun, IBM, Oracle, Lotus, etc. The field of battle is the software industry. Success is measured in shipping applications. Every line of code that is written to our standards is a small victory; every line of code that is written to any other standard, is a small defeat. Total victory, for DRG, is the universal adoption of our standards by developers, as this is an important step towards total victory for Microsoft itself: “A computer on every desk and in every home, running Microsoft software.”

Our weapons are psychological, economic, and political–not military. No one is forced to adopt our standards at the barrel of a gun. We can only convince, not compel.

Rest Here




the same procedure as every year...

...and again a member of the tinfoil-hat-wearing faction has dug out a well-known, prehistoric Microsoft strategy paper - congratulations! And what is your excuse for boring us to death, dear sir?

So what is your complaint

So what is your complaint with the article, exactly?

Are you saying that the current situation with Mono is somehow different, so what was written years ago doesn't apply?

Or are you saying that MS has changed as a company and no longer adheres to those philosophies?

Or are you just easily bored?

Clear as day

Microsoft go strictly by the 'secret' plan laid out in those documents; clearly the company strives by never, ever adapting its strategy to changing market situations and instead thinking up new programming-languages and multimedia-frameworks, NOT as a means of strengthening their own portfolio or promoting their own system, but ONLY with the hostile intent of undermining that every-looming threat of desktop-Linux' world-domination that otherwise would be just beyond the horizon...

Yes, in order to stop and crush us irreverent 1% of computer users who use Linux on the desktop Microsoft thinks it prudent to sink billions of dollars in wicked schemes, spies, saboteurs, and, oh, Windows, which of course also only was created to taunt us.

I don't say that I of all persons have the strongest grip on business-realities; but the author of that article we comment here has definitely lost it.

Edit: And yes, I believe that Microsoft has changed in one respect - back in the day they thought Linux might be a threat to them. But that threat never came to life. Now MS seems to have realized there might actually be money in co-opting Linux.

Microsoft bashers

Microsoft bashers are such morons.

What company, project, team, person, etc doesn't have a strategy to "win"?

Microsoft certainly does NOT have a monopoly on that idea.

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