Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The five-minutes-fix myth

One of the complains I often get for my QA work (which I have to say is vocally not appreciated even by the other devs), is that I could just go on and fix the issues I find rather than opening but for them because “it just takes five minutes from bug to commit” to fix the problem.

No it does not take five minutes to fix something, I can assure you!

Of course people will continue to say that it just takes a few minutes to find the problem and come up with a patch; the problem is that most of the time, for the kind of bugs I report myself, to fix them properly takes much, much more.

Most of the time that some developer decides that some single problem does not warrant to remove a package, even if it doesn’t have anybody looking after it, the same packages re-enter my radar at the next round of tinderboxing, or in the best of cases, a few months later.

Rest Here

RE: with a question?

I don't know what your comment has to do with Gentoo specific package maintenance, but I'm anyway a bit curious to know what off-topic subject you discuss. What kind of "illegal shutdown" do you refer to? The last question, does it ask for better support for standby mode or less need for "illegal shutdowns" whatever it refers to?

its atang1, his (?) comments

its atang1, his (?) comments often are off-topic and filled with technical stuff that seems unrelated and filled with more strange, open-ended questions than any sort of actual comment.

the atang1 bot

I'm pretty sure atang1 is a bot with some kind of AI tool to scrape pseudo-relevant comments from the web. I have seen similar bots on other sites. However, it seems pretty harmless with no spam links. It just adds a bit of noise to the discussion Smile


CHING CHUG CHING CHUG CHING (imagine a teletype chugging out text) CHUG CHING CHUG CHING DING!

The SysOP for ATANG1 BOT requests that all comments made to the bot be in x86 machine code↵

All others will be piped to NULL↵



five minutes

the article wrote:
is that I could just go on and fix the issues I find rather than opening but for them because “it just takes five minutes from bug to commit” to fix the problem.

I could take five minutes to fix the horrible example of what this guy calls "grammar", but then I wouldn't have time to make this snarky comment.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Alpine Linux 3.4.5 Released with Linux Kernel 4.4.27 LTS, Latest Security Fixes

A new maintenance update of the server-oriented Alpine Linux 3.4 operating system has been released, bringing a new Linux kernel version from the long-term supported 4.4 series and the latest security patches. Read more

DebEX Distro Now Lets You Create an Installable Debian 9 Live DVD with Refracta

After informing us of the release of Exton|OS Light Build 161021, today, October 26, 2016, GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton sent an email to announce the availability of DebEX Barebone Build 161025. The latest version of the DebEX Barebone GNU/Linux distribution, build 161025, is here, based on the soon-to-be-released Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" (Debian Testing) operating system and kernel 4.8.0-21-exton, a specially crafted Linux kernel package based on the latest stable Linux 4.8 kernel. Read more Just released: KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Public Release

Linux Kernel News

  • BUS1 Kernel Message Bus Posted For Review
    David Herrmann has posted the initial patches for review of the BUS1 kernel message bus, the successor to KDBUS as an in-kernel IPC mechanism. Herrmann announced, "This proposal introduces bus1.ko, a kernel messaging bus. This is not a request for inclusion, yet. It is rather an initial draft and a Request For Comments. While bus1 emerged out of the kdbus project, bus1 was started from scratch and the concepts have little in common. In a nutshell, bus1 provides a capability-based IPC system, similar in nature to Android Binder, Cap'n Proto, and seL4. The module is completely generic and does neither require nor mandate a user-space counter-part."
  • Linux 4.9 Is Going To Be The “Biggest Ever” Linux Release
    The next Linux kernel release, i.e., Linux 4.9, could be the biggest ever Linux release in terms of the commits. Linus Torvalds shared this news in the release announcement of Linux 4.9-rc2. He also hinted at the possibility of turning 4.9 into an LTS release. The final build of the kernel is expected to arrive in December.

Quirky 8.1 Linux Is Built with Ubuntu 16.04 Binary DEBs, Supports Raspberry Pi 3

Puppy Linux developer Barry Kauler was happy to announce the general availability of his Quirky 8.1 "Xerus" GNU/Linux distribution built with binary DEB packages from the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system. Quirky 8.1 "Xerus" is here to replace the old "April" series, and while it is indeed built using the binary DEBs of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, it stays true to being a distro from the Puppy Linux family and not an Ubuntu clone. However, it lets users install packages from the official Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) software repositories, a feature that was not available in the Quirky "April" releases. Read more