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The five-minutes-fix myth

One of the complains I often get for my QA work (which I have to say is vocally not appreciated even by the other devs), is that I could just go on and fix the issues I find rather than opening but for them because “it just takes five minutes from bug to commit” to fix the problem.

No it does not take five minutes to fix something, I can assure you!

Of course people will continue to say that it just takes a few minutes to find the problem and come up with a patch; the problem is that most of the time, for the kind of bugs I report myself, to fix them properly takes much, much more.

Most of the time that some developer decides that some single problem does not warrant to remove a package, even if it doesn’t have anybody looking after it, the same packages re-enter my radar at the next round of tinderboxing, or in the best of cases, a few months later.

Rest Here




RE: with a question?

I don't know what your comment has to do with Gentoo specific package maintenance, but I'm anyway a bit curious to know what off-topic subject you discuss. What kind of "illegal shutdown" do you refer to? The last question, does it ask for better support for standby mode or less need for "illegal shutdowns" whatever it refers to?

its atang1, his (?) comments

its atang1, his (?) comments often are off-topic and filled with technical stuff that seems unrelated and filled with more strange, open-ended questions than any sort of actual comment.

the atang1 bot

I'm pretty sure atang1 is a bot with some kind of AI tool to scrape pseudo-relevant comments from the web. I have seen similar bots on other sites. However, it seems pretty harmless with no spam links. It just adds a bit of noise to the discussion Smile

re: ATANG1 BOT

CHING CHUG CHING CHUG CHING (imagine a teletype chugging out text) CHUG CHING CHUG CHING DING!

The SysOP for ATANG1 BOT requests that all comments made to the bot be in x86 machine code↵

All others will be piped to NULL↵

EOL↵

###

five minutes

the article wrote:
is that I could just go on and fix the issues I find rather than opening but for them because “it just takes five minutes from bug to commit” to fix the problem.

I could take five minutes to fix the horrible example of what this guy calls "grammar", but then I wouldn't have time to make this snarky comment.

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