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Google Chrome OS-based netbook tech specs are out

Believe it or not - the tech specs of the rumoured Google Chrome OS-based netbook are already out and by the sound of it, the netbook looks to me like a high performance machine.

The Google netbook, it is reported, will run on Chrome OS (what else?) and will boast of a chipset from Nvidia's Tegra line and it will be powered by an ARM CPU (which reportedly performs better than Intel Atom and consumes less power).

It is also rumoured that the netbook will sport a 10.1-inch TFT HD-ready multi-touch display, and would come with 64GB SSD (mind you, not HDD), 2GB RAM and other bells and whistles such as WiFi, 3G, Bluetooth, Ethernet port, USB ports, webcam, 3.5mm audio jack, multi-card reader, etc.

The netbook, is expected to launch in the holiday season of 2010.

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