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10 Mistakes Google Is Making with Chrome OS

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Google

As 2009 comes to an end and the technology industry looks ahead to 2010, it's Chrome OS that could arguably steal the show in the new year. It will be the first desktop operating system Google has ever released. It will also be released with one goal in mind: to beat Windows 7 wherever and whenever it can.

That's a tall order, for sure. Microsoft reigns supreme in the operating-system space. Windows 7, unlike its predecessor Windows Vista, has an opportunity to solidify Microsoft's position in the market with an experience that bests other operating systems on the market. So as Google prepares its Chrome OS for the market, it can't make any mistakes. The more mistakes the company makes, the more difficult it will be for Google to compete. Simply put, Microsoft has applied pressure that will dictate Google's moves going forward.

However, Google has already made mistakes. The search giant is focused on the wrong things. And it could come back to haunt it. Let's take a look at some of the mistakes Google has made.

1. No Chrome OS netbook




Top 10 Google Stories of 2009

eweek.com: It would be an understatement to opine that 2009 was a big year for Google. With many businesses still laying employees off and struggling to retrench from the tough recession, the search engine flourished. Google unveiled several new products, made acquisitions and eyed new markets, including a plan to offer Chrome Operating System on netbooks in 2010.

In this slideshow, eWEEK recaps Google's busy year.

5 Ways Google Could Drop the Open-Source Ball

maximumpc.com: What a year for Google! But instead of waxing nostalgic about all of "The Goog's" fancy Web-based services or search refinements or what-have-you, I think it's important to note just how dramatically Google has made its mark on the open-source world in 2009.

Yes, I'm talking about Chrome. Or Android. Or Chrome-Android. You know, those two independent-but-not-really operating systems that are different yet similar enough to warrant Google splitting them with a wink-and-a-nod that they'll likely be combined at some grand point in the future.

For all the intelligence packed into the dark recesses of Google's worldwide campuses, the company doesn't have a walk-in-the-park path to victory in the mobile, desktop, or laptop markets with its bevy of open-source operating systems.

Here's why:

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