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Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.33 (Part 1) - Networking

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Linux

On Tuesday night, Linus Torvalds released Linux 2.6.33-rc3, the third release candidate of Linux version 2.6.33. The forthcoming version is expected to be finalised in early March and this release candidate offers a smaller number of changes than is usual at this point in the development cycle – it seems that some of the kernel hackers took some time off over Christmas.

However, most of the important new features of the next version in the Linux main development line were already integrated by Torvalds and his fellow programmers in the "merge window" phase at the start of the development cycle. As it is uncommon for newly integrated items to be discarded again in the current second phase, the Kernel Log can already provide a comprehensive overview of the most important new features of Linux 2.6.33.

To avoid being swamped by the wealth of advancements, the Kernel Log will provide the overview in its usual multi-part series of articles that together discuss the kernel's various functional areas.

The first part of the "Coming in 2.6.33" series deals with the most important changes to the kernel's network support.




Coming soon...

This means dropped support for wireless from my desktop and laptop both of which were working within 5min of installing linux.

My drivers:
wl driver from broadcom is incompatable with the kernel liscence, but as good as opensource.
rt3070sta worked out of the box under 2.6.32 with my desktop wireless usb device. I'll be sad to see that made useless under rt28x00.

However 2.6.33 does bring 3d goodness through my ati cards and kwin. But without internet I can't tell anyone how happy that would make me Sad

Still here's hoping that by 2.6.34 things will settle down. Another good shakeup of linux wireless could be good for faster/newer devices Big Grin

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