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How secure is your computer?

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Security

StillSecure attached six computers - loaded with different versions of the Windows, Linux and Apple's Macintosh operating systems - earlier this month to the Internet without anti-virus software.

The results show the Internet is a very rough place.

Over the course of a week, the machines were scanned a total of 46,255 times by computers around the world that crawl the Web looking for vulnerabilities in operating systems.

Once the vulnerabilities were identified, the remote computers launched 4,892 direct attacks with a staggering variety of worms, Trojan Horses, viruses, spyware and other forms of malware.

Full Story.

Wrong wrong wrong

They are wrong on many accounts. You do not have to pay Novell a cent for security updates. Also they are comparing obsolete versions of Suse and Mac OS X. The latest version of Suse is 10.0 and the latest version of Mac OS is 10.4 Tiger. I use them both in production use and they are very stable. Also Mac OS X and Suse notify you by default when a security update becomes available and it is a couple clicks to install at the most.

danger will robinson, danger

i think what is at issue here is the fact that this so called 'test' has little merit. why do we care if a computer supposedly fresh outa the box with no user input is going to be hacked? wouldn't it be better to test real users running their computers the way they normally would on a day-to-day basis??

i wonder if they were listening to a sony cd while the test was being conducted... =)

*******
http://myfirstlinux.com

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