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Facebook Is Now an Apache Software Foundation Gold Sponsor

Facebook just announced that it has become a Gold sponsor of the Apache Software Foundation. According to Facebook's David Recordon, the company wants to give back to the open source community that allowed Facebook to develop and contribute to projects like the Thrift framework, Hive, memcached and Cassandra. Apache Gold members donate $40,000 per year to the project. It's worth noting that this is not Apache's highest sponsorship level. Google, Yahoo and Microsoft are platinum sponsors and give $100,000 per year.

In total, Facebook has developed or contributes to over 20 open source projects. Facebook also released the real-time web framework Tornado, one of FriendFeed's core technologies, as an open source project shortly after it acquired FriendFeed in August 2009.

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Apache to end 1.3 and 2.0

theregister.co.uk: The Apache Software Foundation may formally end development of the long-in-tooth 1.3 and 2.0 branches of its Apache HTTP Server to focus support on the 2.2.xx branch.

No formal announcement has been made, but in a message to the Apache web server developer mailing list, ASF member Colm MacCárthaigh recommended putting the 1.3.x branch to bed after a final release. The post was first spotted by TechWorld. MacCárthaigh suggested the swan song edition include a formal announcement it's the final release and that future security fixes and maintenance will be available as patches.

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