Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Lock Down Desktops with KDE Kiosk

Filed under
KDE

Us amazing system and network administrators are frequently required to believe six impossible things before breakfast. Everything is supposed to be easily accessible and convenient, yet everything must also be locked down and controlled. The sane response is to smile and nod wisely, then do what we think is right.

Having tools to assist the satisfying of impossible demands helps. KDE has a Kiosk mode that allows you to create and replicate a fully-customized desktop, with options to lock down various bits to prevent users from changing them. You can do it the hard way, by editing a gaggle of configuration files, or you can do it the easy way with the Kiosk Admin Tool, the graphical KDE Kiosk configurator. (Make someone say that three times quickly.)

Kiosk does not touch applications or services – just the desktop itself, which includes menus, desktop icons, wallpapers, themes, screen savers, file associations, and commands. It lets you set up loose controls for business environments, or tight controls for public terminals that are used by a lot of random people.

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Financial News

Leftovers: Gaming

An Aerospace Coder Drags a Stodgy Industry Toward Open Source

More than a decade ago, software engineer Ryan Melton spent his evenings, after workdays at Ball Aerospace, trying to learn to use a 3-D modeling program. After a few weeks, for all his effort, he could make … rectangles that moved. Still, it was a good start. Melton showed his spinning digital shapes to Ball, a company that makes spacecraft and spacecraft parts, and got the go-ahead he’d been looking for: He could try to use the software to model a gimbal—the piece on a satellite that lets the satellite point. Melton wanted to build the program to save himself time, learn something new. “It was something I needed for me,” he says. But his work morphed into a software project called Cosmos—a “command and control” system that sends instructions to satellites and displays data from their parts and pieces. Ball used it for some 50 flight projects and on-the-ground test systems. And in 2014, Melton decided Cosmos should share its light with the world. Today, it’s been used with everything from college projects to the planet-seeking Kepler telescope. Read more

Laptop Power, Boot Times With Ubuntu 17.04

I haven't posted any mobile/laptop Linux benchmarks recently since my newest laptop at the moment is still based on Broadwell with having no Kabylake laptop at the moment. But for those curious about any power/boot changes for mature Intel Broadwell hardware on Linux, hopefully you find these numbers today interesting. Read more