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Testing Chromium on Ubuntu

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Software

I’ve read a lot about Google’s Chrome browser in the blogosphere, but have yet to see it being used in the wild. Given this observation, and my increasingly strained relationship with Firefox, I decided to give Chromium, the open-source browser on which Chrome is based, another try.

Cool things about Chromium

I played around with Chromium early last summer, but it was far too raw at that point to be a serious contender for production use. That’s all changed, and there are a number of aspects of Chromium that I found impressive.

For starters, it seems quite a bit speedier than Firefox 3.5, especially on javascript-heavy websites–which is not surprising, since many of Google’s most profitable services, like Gmail, depend heavily on javascript, providing a strong incentive for Google to ensure those applications are maximally responsive. I didn’t run any benchmarks myself, but most of those I read, such as this one, reported similar findings on Chromium’s speed.

Chromium also offers a slew of features that aren’t available in Firefox by default.




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