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School computer introductions

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Just talk

After reading an article recently on a similar topic, I got to thinking about what I was introduced to relating to computers when I was in school.

I was in high school when I got my first real introduction to computers.

The school had a big old IBM mainframe that took up practically one whole room on it's own and a connected room with dumb terminals connected to it.

We learned COBOL, Pascal, BASIC, Fortran and other programming languages of the day.

In other classrooms were the brand new Apple computer models running Apple BASIC.

They were upgraded as time went on (I was a sophomore when I walked into the building.) Apple 2's 2 e's , Macs, etc.. were eventually added.

I was out of school when the PC's finally made their way into the system.

I was in college some years later as a computer network tech training course focusing on Novell Netware. MS was still on Dos 6 and Windows 3.11 was all the rage.

Now, a 'few' years later, and we are seeing 'free' software being put in use for daily situations and professional servers.

Wow, what a rush.

Big Bear

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