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Open Solaris 2009.06 - Slowly getting there

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OS

For some strange reason, I keep going back to Open Solaris. Maybe it's the beautiful Gnome desktop, well arranged and streamlined. Maybe it's the belief that Sun, one of the great technology leaders in the past 30 years, can deliver a usable operating system intended for the home market. And maybe it's my desire to crack open the frightening secrets of UNIX, for Linux, Open Solaris is not.

Open Solaris 2009.06 is the current release, available for free download, albeit in 32-bit architecture only. I've tested both previous editions, having found the earlier 2008.05 to be rather frustrating and inadequate and 2008.11 to be reasonable if still a bit too difficult for the average user. Well, time to see what the latest build can offer.

So if you're in a mood for a rather non-Linux review, please take a few minutes to read the review. The repertoire includes live CD testing, installation and a handsome week of usage, covering tiny yet important details like Wireless connectivity, Samba sharing, multimedia support, usability, and more.

Live CD




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