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Geeks weigh in on the best movies of 2005

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Movies

From the long-awaited birth of Darth Vader to the ultimately reviled (box office) Doom, 2005 produced both major achievements and serious let-downs when it came to the types of far-out movies that IT geeks seem to love.

Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith, which documented the transformation of Anakin Skywalker into the evil lord Darth Vader, and Sin City, the big screen adapation of the classic Frank Miller comic book series, topped the list of IT pros' favorite geeked-out movies of 2005, according to TechTarget's second annual (and highly unscientific) polling of IT geeks across the land.

Batman Begins, the story of how the dark knight came to be, Steven Spielberg's War of the Worlds and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire were also high up on the list of geek's 2005 favorites.

"Sin City was probably the best movie of the past several years, in fact, and not just because it has Jessica Alba," said Doug Linder, a longtime Unix systems administrator. "[Star Wars Episode III's] opening spaceship battle sequence was one of the most amazing pieces of special effects ever created and was worth the price of admission by itself."

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