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Mandrake Thinking Name Change?

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MDV

There's an interesting thread running on one of the mandrake mailing lists discussing the possibility of an upcoming name change since their buy out of Connectiva. Seems there may be some truth to the rumors as a whois it might prove.

as one regular points out:

"whois mandriva.com provides some interesting results:
domain: MANDRIVA.COM
owner-address: Mandrakesoft SA
owner-address: 43 rue d'Aboukir
owner-address: 75002
owner-address: Paris
owner-address: France
owner-phone: +33.140410041
owner-fax: +33.140419200
owner-e-mail: hostmaster@mandrakesoft.com <<<=====
admin-c: MS159-GANDI
tech-c: AR41-GANDI
bill-c: MS159-GANDI

nserver: ns1.moondrake.net 212.85.147.163 <<<=====
nserver: ns2.moondrake.net 212.43.244.27

reg_created: 2005-02-28 07:11:42

expires: 2006-02-28 07:11:42
created: 2005-02-28 13:11:42 <<<=====
changed: 2005-03-24 12:03:37
-------

Considering the timing:"

Paris, France; Curitiba, Brazil; February 24th , 2005 - Mandrakesoft, today announced a definitive agreement to acquire Conectiva.

And another points this out:

"and it seems Mandrakesoft has been busy registering many names
that may be used since mantiva.[com/org] are also registered
the same day as the above...

BUT...

there is more movement on the "mandriva" front...

Mandrakesoft now has registered even more versions of mandriva,
either directly or indirectly...

They currently owns atleast: at, be, biz, ca, ch, cn, co.nz, co.uk,
co.za, com, com.tw, cz, dk, fr, info, net, nl, li, org, pl, .info

and most of them are registered around 25 march 2005...

so it seems to me it's already decided..."

Interesting, interesting... things that make ya go hmmmm...

re: In light of the previous lega

Yeah, your right. Dang, I should have mentioned that in the story. Thanks!

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re: ConMan would be bad

I think the original post was meant as an insult as well, so I suppose it'd be even more fitting for the OP in light of your information. Conman in America isn't exactly a compliment. Seems Mandrakelinux has become one of those distros you either really love or you really dislike for many people. For me, I'm not too interested in running it fulltime anymore, but I have nostalgic feelings for it. I'm interested in their work and keep a distant eye on it.

Thanks for your post.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re: both horrible choiches

I agree. I think any name change is a mistake. I thought using Mandrakelinux was supposed to take care of the legal issues, so I suppose they are probably thinking of capitalizing on the connectiva popularity in latin american regions. I don't know, I think it'd be a mistake. ... or perhaps just the end of a era.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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