Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

ECS NVIDIA GeForce GT 240 512MB

Filed under
Hardware

A month after NVIDIA launched the GeForce GT 220 graphics card they rolled out the GeForce GT 240, to further fill the performance void between the GT216-based GT 220 and the GeForce GTS 250 that had been around since March. The $100 GeForce GT 240 has received some praise for its low-power consumption while delivering a decent level of performance for being a mid-range graphics card, but of course, those reviews have been when tested under Microsoft Windows. We finally have our hands on a GeForce GT 240 graphics card from the folks over at ECS Elitegroup to see how this GT215 graphics card performs under Linux.

The GeForce GT 240 uses NVIDIA's GT215 core that packs 96 CUDA cores, a graphics clock of 550MHz, a processor clock of 1340MHz, built on a 40nm process, and is compatible with OpenGL 3.2 (as well as DirectX 10.1 for those who care), PCI Express 2.0, and is compatible with PureVideo HD. There is also the assortment of other features common to GeForce 200 series graphics cards like PhysX support (though not under Linux), OpenCL, dual-link DVI, etc. NVIDIA's board partners can choose from implementing DDR3, GDDR3, or GDDR5 on GeForce GT 240 graphics cards with either a 512MB or 1GB configuration. In the event of the ECS GeForce GT 240 graphics card we were testing (model: NGT240-512QI-F) there is 512MB of GDDR5 memory with a 128-bit data bus. Like the GeForce GT 220, the GT 240 has a PureVideo VP4 (Feature Set C) engine that allows the Video Decode and Presentation API for Unix (VDPAU) to accelerate MPEG-4 ASP decoding in addition to the MPEG-1, MPEG-2, VC-1/WMV9, and H.264 video formats that are supported by all other VDPAU-supported NVIDIA graphics cards.

REst Here




More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.0-rc2

So rc2 missed the usual Sunday afternoon timing, because I spent most of the weekend debugging an issue that happened on an old Mac Mini I have around, and I hate making even early -rc releases with problems on machines that I have direct access to. Even if it only affected old machines that actual developers are unlikely to have or at least use. Today I got the patch from Daniel Vetter to fix it, so instead of doing a Sunday evening rc2, it's a Tuesday morning one. Go get it. It works better for the delay. Other than that little one-liner i915 fix? Not much, actually. It's been a very quiet week, for being this early in the release process. Sure, 3.19-rc2 was even smaller, so it continues a trend, but that was the xmas week. I hope this low volume is just because the 4.0 merge window itself was somewhat calmer than most recent releases. But I suspect the real reason is that the driver and networking trees from GregKH and davem are pending, and didn't make rc2. We'll see. Anyway, the shortlog is appended, and testing is appreciated, Linus Read more

6 Linux-y announcements from Mobile World Congress

I earlier wrote about how Linux invaded CES 2015. The domination continues at Mobile World Congress, which kicked off this week in Barcelona. Here are some of the major announcements from MWC that show that Linux has become an unstoppable force. Read more

Jolla shows off Sailfish tablet, promises ultra-secure phone

Jolla released Sailfish OS 2.0, showed off the first tablet to run the OS, and announced plans with SSH to develop a security-hardened version of Sailfish. Read more

New Ubuntu Phone Separates the App from the Data

As CIO Journal has noted, Mr. Shuttleworth envisions the rise of an Ubuntu-powered phone that runs desktop grade applications and plugs into peripherals such as large displays and keyboards. In other words, he is working to achieve true mobile-desktop-laptop convergence — the only computer you need, in your pocket, all the time. He tried to raise $32 million to fund development of such a phone, known as the Edge, in a widely publicized crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo. The campaign ended in 2013, short of its goal. Read more