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Buying a Linux Laptop ...

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Linux

It started with the hints of death of my Dell XPS 1330, a pattern I found discussed in a few forums online … the pattern is, first the adapter no longer is recognized as serving the appropriate wattage. (Which powers the laptop, but at a lower CPU rate and will not charge the battery. Bought a replacement adapter, and it worked for nearly a week, when it, too, failed with the dreaded message upon boot up. The next pattern is overheating, then motherboard failure.

So, I began my quest for a replacement.

I really liked my XPS, and the smaller display form factor, but I wanted to do something different this time, order a laptop pre-installed with Linux, or at least not loaded with any OS. Dell makes mention of an offer of installing Ubuntu, it isn't the easiest search, and the only laptops so noted were either 10” (too small) or 15.4.”

My next thought was to Lenovo. I use a T-61 at the church I serve, dual-booting XP and LinuxMint 8. Everything works. I un-dock it in my office and plug it into another dock in the sanctuary. When I lift the lid, it neatly comes out of hibernation and instantly hooks up to the audio and the LCD projector.

I like the quality of this T-61.

Investigating the Lenovo site, I knew I would have a fight. No mention of Linux, except with some future Snapdragon offerings this summer. Maybe if I went through the ordering process, and use this bit of news, I could win?

No. No persuasion worked, or is possible at present. Nothing goes out without Windows, as it was explained, “We have a license agreement with Microsoft.”

So thanks to two sites, and there are others like them ...
http://mcelrath.org/laptops.html
and
http://tuxmobil.org/reseller.html

… I found lists of companies which either install Linux, or will sell a computer with no operating system installed.

I was really having fun! At one site, I found a laptop with Windows 7 installed, but also with a selection to have none and an instant price-reduction when the “No OS” choice was made. That felt good!

I finally found a computer which met all my needs; weight, size, quality of hardware and Ubuntu installed (one of many choices) at LinuxCertified.

I hope others will join me in buying your next computer this way. You will find competitive prices and the satisfaction of not paying the Windows tax.

revdjenk

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hardware choice offers OS choice

Yes, atang1, since Linux kernel is modular, and with the variety of choices in many of the application categories, we can better tune the hardware we use! This is one reason I use Linux, I can have everything, including gui eye-candy, or use a lighter footprint to obtain phenomenal speeds. Smile

revdjenk

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