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KDE Developers to Release RC3 for 4.4

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KDE

Toma Albers, one of the KDE Developers sent out a note today that there will be an RC3 release for KDE 4.4, prior to the final release scheduled February 9th.

The biggest thing to note is that this will not delay the tagging or release of KDE 4.4. Here’s the official announcement from the KDE Mailing List which explains why the extra RC was warranted:

The release team has decided to insert an additional Release Candidate before the final 4.4.0. This release candidate will be tagged next thursday (28th) and will be released as soon as the tarballs are confirmed to be ok, ideally the same day.

The extra RC is added due to the struggle we had with the RC2 tarballs. We want to make sure everything is ok now, so the 4.4.0 release will not be delayed by similar issues.

bit more here




Mad at KDE 4.4

The KDE 4 developers are now forcing you to use Nepomuk and Akonadi if you want to use KDE 4.4. I have a nicely custom built KDE 4.3.4 tweaked with some gcc compile options and the above items totally disabled. I was able to achieve about 85% the speed of my most excellent KDE 3.5.10 desktop.

I don't need to index my files. I put things in folders called Music, Pictures, Documents, Videos and Downloads where I can find them. I don't need to index my dang Kmail in a database that can be shared. I have emails going back years and they are all cataloged into folders. The search function works just fine.

Why are they forcing this crap on me? I don't want my nimble KDE 4 turning into a CPU hogging Vista Molasses operating system. Please KDE developers listen to your fans and stop this madness now!

RE: Mad at KDE 4.4

poodles wrote:
The KDE 4 developers are now forcing you to use Nepomuk and Akonadi if you want to use KDE 4.4. I have a nicely custom built KDE 4.3.4 tweaked with some gcc compile options and the above items totally disabled. I was able to achieve about 85% the speed of my most excellent KDE 3.5.10 desktop.

I don't need to index my files. I put things in folders called Music, Pictures, Documents, Videos and Downloads where I can find them. I don't need to index my dang Kmail in a database that can be shared. I have emails going back years and they are all cataloged into folders. The search function works just fine.

Why are they forcing this crap on me? I don't want my nimble KDE 4 turning into a CPU hogging Vista Molasses operating system. Please KDE developers listen to your fans and stop this madness now!

Well said...

Andy

re: mad

yeah, I feel the same way too. In fact, if I can find replacement apps, it's time for me to move on.

re: mad

In Gnome/gtk, it's all about third party. I managed to put together a DE I'm satisfied with - the process included purchasing Nero - but I still feel it's not as intergrated and harmonious as my old KDE3 desktop. Maybe it's just time painting rose what's gone.

Re: Mad at KDE 4.4

I'm sure you may need to compile these features but I'm on a nightly build of KDE4.5 and even in 4.4 I could disable these features when using the desktop. Maybe openSuSE has some options/patches that aren't mainstream for some reason.
Then again on a laptop these things don't tend to get enabled from my experience (yes you notice however when they do Sad )

Mad at KDE 4.4?

Original comment surprised me. On my *testing* desktop box I'm running Mandriva Cooker (Mandriva's development build), updating 2-3 times a day. Mandriva is tracking KDE 4.4 development (it's now at KDE 4.3.95 or KDE 4.4RC2) and Kernel development (now 2.6.33rc5) fairly closely. I have the option to turn off those features (nepomuk & akonadi, which I do).

With the improved qt4.6.1 toolkit on which KDE is based, I'm getting snappier performance than ever.

Mad at KDE 4.4

gfranken wrote:
Original comment surprised me. On my *testing* desktop box I'm running Mandriva Cooker (Mandriva's development build), updating 2-3 times a day. Mandriva is tracking KDE 4.4 development (it's now at KDE 4.3.95 or KDE 4.4RC2) and Kernel development (now 2.6.33rc5) fairly closely. I have the option to turn off those features (nepomuk & akonadi, which I do).

With the improved qt4.6.1 toolkit on which KDE is based, I'm getting snappier performance than ever.

KDE developers have removed the kcm module from SystemSettings so you are not updated fully to 4.3.95. In addition KDEpim kmail will not run without akonadi. I was able to disable nepomuk by removing the backend that it needs to start so at least that cpu hogging piece of junk is gone.

Do you have the option?

You're right--upon checking, I have akonadi running, as I do use kmail on this box, but I have nepomuk disabled. I suspect the real CPU/memory hog is with nepomuk and strigi both enabled (they're in the same KDE dialog).

I've dumped KDE 4.4 for the

I've dumped KDE 4.4 for the exact same reasons mentioned above- Akonadi and Nepomuk. I fail to understand, why the the fsck do I need to have a MySQL server running on my laptop to merely index and hold my PIM data?? A good blog on this is at :- http://lukeplant.me.uk/blog/posts/a-plea-to-kde-developers/ and the comments below it . KDE apps are the best - but their decisions on the overall desktop experience are very very disappointing.

I am pissed off enough to go to GNOME full-time. Evolution as compared to Kontact is relatively less cluttered and doesn't hog your system resources. Tracker as compared to Nepomuk, isn't as full-featured...but can search files just as well. GNOME now looks better with each passing day.

Wait to experience a backlash from everyone once KDE 4.4 is released, and the users will start seeing performance slowdowns because of these dumb-ass technology decisions. KDE 4.4 will be one huge turd if they force the Akonadi and Nepomuk bindings down our collective throats.

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