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Console news, feed and e-mail readers

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Feed readers, news readers and e-mail clients all represent a hazy gray area for me, since many of them do two or even three of those things at the same time. So for fun, I have a lump of applications here that might do one of those things, two of them, or maybe all at once. Regardless, they don’t burden your system with garbage, and that’s the real point.

I’m not going to mention alpine or mutt, mostly because mutt is the Internet poster child for console mail readers (meaning you’ve probably already heard about it, and your best friend’s sister’s boyfriend’s brother’s girlfriend has it set up with GMail), and because alpine is something I talk about here. I’ve also mentioned elmo in the past, but because I see no updates on that front, there’s nothing more to say that hasn’t already been said.

First, two important alternatives to alpine and mutt: cone and sup.

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A few thoughts on OpenBSD 5.8

I've been using OpenBSD since way back at release 2.3 in 1998, so I've gone through upgrades that took a fair amount of work due to incompatible changes, like the switch from ipf to pf for host firewalling or the change to ELF binaries. The upgrade from 5.7 to 5.8 was a pretty smooth and easy one, for the most part. The two most painful changes for me were the replacement of sudo with doas and the dropping of support in the rc.conf for the pf_rules variable. While sudo is still available as a package, I like the idea of reducing attack surface with a simpler program, so I made the switch. The two things I miss most about sudo are the ability to authenticate for a period of time and the ability to have a single config file across a whole set of servers. The former I'm just living with, the latter I've adjusted to by having a single config file that has lines commented out depending on which server it's on. I did have one moment of concern about the quality of doas when it incorrectly reported the line number on which I had a syntax error in the config file--fortunately, this was just a failure to increment the line count on continuation lines (ending with a "\") which is fixed in the -current release. Read more

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Phoronix on Graphics

  • Intel Pentium G4400: Benchmarking A ~$60 Skylake Processor
    This CPU certainly isn't meant for any really demanding workloads, but could serve as a potential Linux desktop with basic accelerated graphics via the HD Graphics 510. The Pentium G4400 is still rated to drive up to three displays and can handle 4K via HDMI/DP. Like the other Skylake processors with HD Graphics 530, the hardware can support up to OpenGL 4.4 / DirectX 12 but under Linux the current Mesa driver still only has full OpenGL 3.3 support with the GL 4.x support being a work-in-progress.
  • AMDGPU With PowerPlay Compared To AMD's Catalyst Linux Driver
    With earlier today showing new OpenGL performance numbers for how the Nouveau driver with working re-clocking compared to NVIDIA's proprietary driver, here are some benchmarks to show how the AMDGPU kernel DRM driver with PowerPlay patches compare to AMD's Catalyst driver for the R9 285 (Tonga) and R9 Fury (Fiji) graphics cards.
  • NVIDIA Developer Still Working On PRIME Synchronization
    NVIDIA continues to be working on PRIME synchronization support to fix tearing when using this multi-GPU method. There will be support for this functionality within the proprietary NVIDIA Linux driver.
  • Playing With Intel Skylake OpenCL On Ubuntu 15.10
    As it's been a while since last playing with Intel's Beignet project, the open-source effort to allow OpenCL compute capabilities on HD/Iris Graphics under Linux, I decided to try it out on an Ubuntu 15.10 system this weekend with a Skylake processor.