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Machine Embroidery Management is coming to Linux

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KDE
Software

You may remember that one developer, David Boddie, had done some work, with the result that I could build .png files to visualise my patterns within Dolphin, and that we were hoping that the other developer who had shown interest, Purple-Bobby, would join us. That’s exactly what happened. David and Robert Forsyth, a.k.a.Purple-Bobby, attacked the problem from different angles, which proved to be very informative, as they could feed on each other’s ideas.

This is a representation of the pattern held in the .jef file. It’s not so easy to see in a small image, but the pattern is contained on a white background, which denotes the actual extent of stitching, while the yellow border surrounding it denotes the size of the hoop to be used. The application already can gather a great deal of information about the pattern. One of the considerations to follow this is whether some of that information could be included alongside the actual preview. We have to wait to see the practicalities of that. Meanwhile, take a look at how much information we can already gather:

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