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Review of Xiphos Bible Study Software

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Software

Xiphos (formerly known as GnomeSword) is a Bible study tool written for Linux, UNIX, and Windows under the GNOME toolkit, offering a rich and featureful environment for reading, study, and research using modules from The SWORD Project and elsewhere. It is open-source software, and available free-of-charge to all.

I have used Logos Bible software, e-Sword, as well as other Bible study software in the past. Logos especially is a very good program. The only problem is that on an assistant pastor’s budget, it costs a large sum of money. I have to constantly be aware that I need to be a good steward.

Xiphos, on the other hand is open-source software. Simply, that means I am allowed to go into the program code myself and modify it to behave how i wish it too and use it in the manner I wish. I am legally allowed to share the software, and even encouraged to do so! And for the my bottom line – it is free. Free as in freedom and price.

This is my go-to resource for Bible research and study. I can also easily copy verses to put on handouts and tests in classes. Let’s see how it works.

In the module manager (Edit > Module manager) you can add your source from the list. Since I am not living in a persecuted country, I added all of the internet (remote) sites. Then, refreshed my list and chose my Bible texts, Commentaries, Dictionaries, etc. for installation. There are many resources available, including a fair number of maps from the Xiphos repository.

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