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Showing files metadata under KDE is like Russian roulette

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KDE

While reading KDE Planet, I've noticed this blog post from Peter Penz : Internal Cleanups. He was talking about code cleanups and refactoring he was doing in Dolphin code, which is a very good thing IMHO. Then I learnt something very annoying : since KDE 4.x and Nepomuk integration Dolphin is unable to show metadata informations for a file if the file is not indexed by Strigi and Nepomuk ( KDE bug #193592 ). This explains why I had more and more issues having the size of a photo ... Most of the time I did end up starting Gwenview for this ! This is really insane to have to rely on indexing to show a simple information like the dimensions of a photo. Here are the issues I could see :

1. On my workstations at work, we are using /home on NFS, and really I don't want to enable Nepomuk and Strigi indexing. I do fear about the NFS support for Nepomuk/Strigi, and the fact that I will clutter my file server with the indexing database of each of my users. I have 90Go of data on my file server, I can't imagine the size of the indexing database ... SCSI disks are not cheap !

2. Even if I do activate Nepomuk+Strigi indexing, by default only the user $HOME will be indexed. However what about the service/staff directories ?

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