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Quick and easy Linux security

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

You’ve just set up your Linux desktop. Naturally you want it to be as secure as possible. You’ve heard the rumors that, out of the box, Linux has outstanding security. Is it true? Do you really want to take a chance with that? Most likely not. But what can you do? There are tons of firewall tools you can use (take a look at my article “Build a custom firewall with fwbuilder” for an example). But outside of setting up a firewall on your machine, what can you do to boost the security on your desktop?

In this article you will learn some very simple steps you can take to help make your Linux desktop a bit more secure than “out of the box”. These steps can be done by any level of user, so don’t think you will be doing any recompiling or creating iptables chains.




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