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Clonezilla (Live & Server Edition) review

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Linux

Ever experienced a computer crash the day before you have to turn in an important project? As we all know, backups are your best friends in such situations. There are several types of back-up systems out there today. One method is to clone your hard drive, so that you can restore everything as it was in the event of a crash. Let’s take a look at Clonezilla.

Clonezilla comes in two flavours: the Clonezilla Server Edition (SE) and Clonezilla Live. Clonezilla Server Edition is to be installed on a server in a network. It clones the hard drives of computers over the network. Clonezilla Live, on the other hand, is a Live CD or USB drive based solution. You boot the computer that you want to clone with the Clonezilla Live CD and take a backup. The second option is particularly useful if you are unable to boot into the operating system of your computer.

To get started with the Live version of Clonezilla, you need to download the image from here and burn it onto a CD or a USB drive. You then make the computer boot from the CD or USB drive containing Clonezilla. You should see yourself booting into a Linux distribution. When you boot, you need to pick a version of the kernel to boot in. Select the video resolution, language and the keyboard layout and you should soon be in business. Then you’ll come to the ‘Start Clonezilla’ part of the process, which is where the fun begins.

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