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Forbes Wants to Know

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Hardware

What do you hate about your computer?

In an article outlining some of the headaches with modern computing, Forbes asks in a poll what do you hate most about your computer? Well, I didn't answer because it'd be very different answers depending on whether we're talking about the one at work or at home. The biggest problem with the one at work is how slow it is. They are Dell Optisomethingorothers running WindowsXP and are slow as molasses.

hmmm

The most frustrating part for me in Linux is finding out something that worked before now doesnt work after updating some code. Right now I am battling printer, network printer and usb issues with PCLinuxOS beta and Im sure it is due to udev and hotplug updates. The thing is if you back down to some previous code then it breaks sounds and kmix. fun fun fun. I miss devfsd, atleast it worked and we didnt have these kinds of problems.

I hear ya.

I hear ya. I feel the same way about udev! I had the same problem when I did my newest install. my udev updated yesterday too. I bet it'll be broke when I reboot. Tongue

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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