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Hacking HTC's Windows CE phones with Linux

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Sci/Tech

There is a curious lack in the Linux community -- the number of community-led Linux distributions for commodity mobile phone hardware is zero. There are PDAs for which you can get a GSM/GPRS SD card; there are mobile phones, such as the Motorola A780, that are based on Linux; and there is even the OpenEZX project, which aims to take Motorola's original kernel source for the E680 and A780 Linux phones as the basis for an entirely free-software phone distribution. But there just simply aren't any completed and entirely free Linux distributions, with complete source code, for any commodity mobile phones.

As reported two years ago by LinuxDevices.com, the aim of the Xanadux project is to change that, and this article describes how it's getting on. The devices are the secretive High Tech Computer Corporation's (HTC's) "Designed for Windows CE" PDA phones, which have several codenames -- Wallaby, Himalaya, Blue Angel, Universal, and Magician, to name most of them. They are known by several names -- O2 calls them XDAs, T-Mobile calls them MDAs, and they also go by brand names such as iMate's JasJar.

Full Article.

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