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Open Office 3.2.0 Final Released

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Open Office 3.2.0 Final has been released and is currently distributed to mirror ftp servers worldwide to ensure a smooth delivery once the release notifications will be added to the project’s homepage. Five release candidates and numerous betas have made available before the developer’s of Open Office decided to release the final version of the Office suite.

There are lots of changes and improvements over Open Office 3.1.1, the current stable build that is still offered at the Open Office website.

Among the improvements are faster startup times for Open Office writer, draw and calc, improved ODF format support, added support for proprietary formats like password protected Microsoft Office XML documents, improved statistics function, changes in the way comments are added to Draw or Impress and new diagrams in Chart.

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