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'We are strong supporters of the open source movement'

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Stuart C Wells joined Sun Microsystems in 1988 and has served in a number of key management positions. At present, in his role as the executive vice-president (Utility Computing), Wells' task includes driving the utility grid computing initiatives and remanufacturing programmes. Reporting directly to Sun's President and COO Jonathan Schwartz, he led the Sun ONE product development and product marketing functions for three years.

After 24 years in the industry, Wells holds five US patents in multimedia, video, 3D graphics and imaging, and has numerous international publications. In a tete-e-tete, Wells talks on myriad issues, including Sun's renewed Wall Street attack and maps it against his present mission to now gradually increase adoption for Sun's utility computing business. Excerpts:

Sun was a leader on Wall Street a decade ago. What went wrong?

It's not that everything went wrong with Sun and Wall Street clients. However, I would admit that Sun suffered a setback in the low-end segment since Solaris did not cater to that segment then.

Linux is already an established player.Have you arrived a bit too late?

Sun is not against Linux. We compete against Red Hat. We are strong supporters of the open source movement. But with the introduction of Solaris 10, we believe our customers have a better alternative than Red Hat or IBM.

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