Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Operating systems vendors prep for next-gen hardware

Filed under
OS

IT organizations usually stay loyal to the OS choices they make, but every once in a while, vendors and projects yield a bumper crop of OSes so compelling that the strength of ties binding IT to their chosen operating systems are tested.

Evolution of the Linux 2.6 kernel continued to accelerate in 2005 with the delivery of four significant milestone releases. A relatively new Linux distribution, Ubuntu, is rapidly gaining devotees with its promise to supply a commercial-grade OS without setting aside enterprise features for a commercial release. Sun Microsystems (Profile, Products, Articles) delivered a much-needed jolt to its x86 and SPARC server base with Solaris 10, providing stiff competition to Windows and Linux for the 64-bit x86 platform. Microsoft was particularly busy in the past year as well, with the hallmark being the long-awaited delivery of native 64-bit editions of Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP.

While all of these new operating systems delight for their attention to enhancing stability and technical features, we found only one -- Apple's OS X v10.4 Tiger -- that addresses productivity at the client and server level in ways that dig much deeper than Apple's trademarked glitz.

That Tiger, from kernel to browser, makes the Mac give-to-your-grandmother easy goes without saying. But Tiger also strikes us as the first major release of a desktop OS in which the new features are targeted mainly at professional users.

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: KDE/Qt

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • DNS server attacks begin using BIND software flaw
    Attackers have started exploiting a flaw in the most widely used software for the DNS (Domain Name System), which translates domain names into IP addresses. Last week, a patch was issued for the denial-of-service flaw, which affects all versions of BIND 9, open-source software originally developed by the University of California at Berkeley in the 1980s.
  • Researchers Create First Firmware Worm That Attacks Macs
    The common wisdom when it comes to PCs and Apple computers is that the latter are much more secure. Particularly when it comes to firmware, people have assumed that Apple systems are locked down in ways that PCs aren’t. It turns out this isn’t true. Two researchers have found that several known vulnerabilities affecting the firmware of all the top PC makers can also hit the firmware of MACs. What’s more, the researchers have designed a proof-of-concept worm for the first time that would allow a firmware attack to spread automatically from MacBook to MacBook, without the need for them to be networked.

Brocade CEO: Transition To Open Source Will Be Difficult For Cisco

Communications CEO Lloyd Carney said traditional vendors like Cisco will have a tough time adapting to a more software-defined, open source space. That's because traditional vendors like Cisco's revenue streams are tied to closed architectures, Carney said. Read more