Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

What happens to Sun's open-source software now?

Filed under
Software

The deal is done. Oracle now owns Sun. Oracle's main message to Sun's customers seems to be "Don't worry, be happy." That's not easy when Oracle is not explaining in any detail what it will be doing with open-source software offerings like MySQL, OpenOffice, and OpenSolaris.

In general, we know that Sun's software product catalog will be cut back and that many Sun staffers will soon be laid-off. Historically, when Oracle acquires a company, deep cuts are the rule. For example, Oracle fired about 5,000 workers after acquiring PeopleSoft. This time around Oracle is saying that there will be only about a thousand layoffs. In particular, although no one is going on record, it's feared that Sun's open-source groups will take the brunt of these cuts.

No one is going on record either with what's going to happen to Sun's open-source software. We do know that at least one small open-source project, Project Wonderland, a Java-based platform for developing 3-D virtual worlds, has been cut off from Sun resources. In addition, Oracle is shutting down Project Kenai, Sun's collaborative hosting site for free and open source programs.

But as for the big open-source projects, after talking with people close to the situation, no one at the former Sun knows what Oracle has in mind, and Oracle isn't talking.

Rest Here

Also: Linux MySQL distros meeting in Brussels




re: Sun

So after years of ranting that Open Source is soooooooooo much better then propriatary software - when it actually hits the fan - we find out it isn't?

If your shop depending on any of those open source projects - and those projects die - you're no better off then if it was a commercial product.

Care to compare the cost to setting up your own dev team (with bottomless funding requests), or just buying (fixed cost) licenses to stuff that already works? Yeah, big surprise there.

So why is open source so much better?

Isn't it obvious?

Sure, for some reason or another an open-source project might die as well. It's not just about money since lack of user interest would be the real killer.

I don't understand how you can't see the logical benefit of open-source in this aspect? A proprietary piece of software is dead whenever a business decision is made to drop its support. That's a serious issue for business, something you probably are familiar with, and especially difficult to deal with when a big manufacturer drop driver support of fairly new products.

An open-source project on the other hand might survive as long as its user base stimulate development; it's not bound to be done under the roof of a company initially sponsoring it. It's even possible that they who pick up a project in danger are more talented and have clearer visions than the team dropping it. That's very difficult to achieve with closed-source patented software.

Therefore the shop deciding on which software to use can't be foolishly guided by a dogma that closed-source software equals long term support, just as it can't be naive and this that open-source software will eternally travel though universe with never ending improvements. Looking at this matter as you suggest vonskippy isn't practical. If you can't or it isn't economically beneficial to maintain the software in-house, do your homework and make research before deciding what route to take (be it close- or open-source).

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Ubuntu MATE 17.10

Ubuntu Mate 17.10 is a pretty stable and rock solid distribution which has got most things right. There is nothing unlikable about the distro. However, I feel it could have been a lot better if they had allowed 4 windows to be snapped on each corners and done something about the opaque top panel. The software included are very much standard and even though some of their names have been changed we all know what’s under the hood. Overall Experience has been good. Having already tested Ubuntu with Gnome 3, I can say that Ubuntu Mate 17.10 feels a lot faster and quicker in terms of GUI response. Read more

Compact carrier turns Nvidia Jetson TX2 into an SBC

Aetina’s “ACE-N510” carrier for the Linux-powered Jetson TX1 and TX2 measures only 87 x 50mm, and offers HDMI, 2x USB 3.0, 2x CAN, and optional -20 to 70°C. When Aetina recently unveiled its Nano-ITX (120 x 120mm) ACE-N261 carrier for Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 and earlier, pin-compatible Jetson TX1 COMs, it mentioned an upcoming ACE-N510 that was even smaller. Now we have the details on the little beastie, which like Connect Tech’s Sprocket Jetson carrier, has a compact 87 x 50mm footprint that matches the Jetson modules it stacks on. The ACE-N510 is designed for smart cameras, robots, drones, industrial inspection, mobile medical, and deep learning. Read more

OpenMandriva Is Dropping 32-Bit Support, OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 Is the Last One

Powered by the Linux 4.13.12 kernel, OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 is an enhancement to the previous OpenMandriva Lx 3 releases, adding major improvements to the boot process. The OS also uses the Mesa 17.2.3 graphics stack with S3TC support enabled, the X.Org Server 1.19.5 display server, and systemd 234 init system. On the user-visible side of changes, OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 ships with the KDE Plasma 5.10.5 desktop environment and KDE Frameworks 5.39.0 software stack, along with the latest Firefox Quantum web browser compiled with LLVM/Clang 5.0.0 and Calamares 3.1.8 as default graphical installer. Read more

Kali Linux 2017.3 Ethical Hacking OS Brings InSpy, Sublist3r, and SMB3.0 Support

Coming two months after the previous release, Kali Linux 2017.3 is here with a new kernel, namely Linux 4.13.10, which adds better support for the latest hardware components, as well as all the security patches pushed upstream in the Debian Testing repositories, as well as various new tools. First off, the Linux 4.13.10 kernel adds SMB 3.0 support to CIFS by default, rises the EXT4 directories limit from 10 million entries to up to 2 billion, and enables TLS support. Second, Offensive Security updated several of the included tools for this release, such as The Social Engineering Toolkit, Reaver, Burp Suite, PixieWPS, and Cuckoo. Read more