Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

CloudLinux OS Set to Surface At Parallels Summit

Filed under
Linux

The VAR Guy is booked to meet software giants and disruptive upstarts at Parallels Summit 2010 in Miami. Among the anticipated meetings: A sit-down with Cloud Linux Inc. founder and CEO Igor Seletskiy. The big question: Does the hosting world really need yet another Linux distribution? Seletskiy and Cloud Linux certainly seem to think so. Here’s why.

During a Feb. 23 keynote, Seletskiy is expected to describe how hosting service providers can leverage CloudLinux to maintain balance between number of users per server and the load the server can carry. The Parallels event is expected to mark the first time Seletskiy takes the stage to talk about the CloudLinux OS.

Launched in 2009 and based in Princeton, N.J., Cloud Linux claims the company’s CloudLinux OS is the “only Linux–based, commercially supported operating system (OS) optimized for shared hosting providers and datacenters.”

Hmmm… The VAR Guy is skeptical




I can't wait for your sit down with CloudLinux

So Mr. VAR Guy --

The more skeptical you are -- the sweeter it will be when you learn why CloudLinux really does rock.

Igor, the CEO, has been in this space for over a dozen years and the problem he solved was bugging him "for 3 years". Can't wait to hear your reaction after your sit down.

Don't worry - I won't say "I told you so".

Respectfully,
Judy, Chief CloudLinux Cheerleader, Shapiro Smile

P.S. - I hope are enjoying the Miami sun while we freeze up here in the Northeast.

re: Skeptical

Perhaps if your web site was more substance then fluff, people wouldn't be so skeptical.

And maybe fix the broken links???

Example...
http://www.cloudlinux.com/company/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=210

The "more..." link is malformed - lose the extra http// in the link.

Things like that make it hard to believe your other claims.

It will be interesting to see what the VAR GUY reports back.

Judy Shapiro

Hi vonskippy - Thanks for the link fix. Our focus is on creating meaty solutions -- not websites Smile

But your point is well taken and we appreciate the feedback. Thanks.

Judy Shapiro

re: Meaty solutions

Many startups, to their later dismay, woeful under estimate the importance of a good website.

I think your glib "Our focus is on creating meaty solutions - not websites" indicates you're one of them.

Your "meaty solutions" are DIRECTLY tied to the Internet, so I find your lack of concern disturbing. If you don't care about your web image - why should I care about your product?

Fine, maybe you have a killer sales force - but why piss away the fringe clients that come across your product thru side channels? Their first (and probably last) step will be looking to your website for real information - something that is practically nonexistent on your current site.

Except for lots of marketing buzz words - what proof do you offer on your website that your product does anything at all. White papers - nope that link is empty. Detailed analysis of your product vs others - nope again, still just vaporous marketspeak.

You seem to be taking your cheerleader title just a tad too literal. Less rah rah and more real info is what it takes to launch a new product (unless of course you have great pom poms, then maybe you could do both).

You might indeed have the next greatest thing since sliced meat byproducts, but you're certainly not convincing anyone serious to take a second look.

White paper coming

Hi again -

Whoa - it's not that we don't take it all seriously -- it's just launching a new company requires a disciplined, priority approach where some things take precedence over others.

As to your real point -- where's the meaty data - at the Parallel show, the CEO of CloudLinux is presenting the results of a web server study which describes the challenges of creating a well balanced, yet optimized web server. A white paper detailing the study and how CloudLinux addresses these issues is due to be up on the site within the next 10 days. Your demand to get better info on the site is fair and that activity is already underway, e.g. case studies.

Please accept my overenthusiastic cheerleader stance for what it - my excitement that as such a new company we were able to get 6 partners signed up in 30 days. I did not mean my excitement to be confused for flippancy. It was not intended.

But in the end, it is the product that should do all the talking - certainly not me. That's what really counts as I am sure you would agree. So I hope you do take a second look since I claim no great talent at poms poms Smile

Judy Shapiro

ever heard of a little known company called Novell?

You may have, it's the biggest company out there with the smallest and worst marketing department ever, and it hasn't fixed that marketing dept in over 15 years .

Novell, I have always thought, produces great products but never gets them to the public correctly because their focus has been on the "meaty solutions" as well.

Because they consistently fail to market themselves and their product correctly or successfully, they are a perennial underdog, coming from behind.

VonSkippy has a point in that no matter how great your product is, if you don't make it accessible, and I hate to say it, but "exciting" to the drubs of the media industry, it won't be seen as the great solution you want it to be, if it is seen at all.

Take a lesson from Novell and pay attention to the details of your marketing.

Big Bear

re: Novell

Novell shafted their VAR's and shot themselves in the foot time and time again.

Novell wanted their VAR's to pick up the table scrapes, and wanted their in-house sales force to get the cherry (i.e. read "big") accounts, even if that meant stealing those big accounts directly from their VARs.

After the third or fourth time of doing that, and then backpedaling saying it was all just a big misunderstanding and it wouldn't happen again, any VAR with a brain jumped ship faster then Lindsay Lohan fills up barf bags.

Novell is absolutely clueless on how to market their product or run their company. They had the de facto BEST networking software ever - and pissed that away and let Microsoft completely steal that market away from them, by fumble finger handling their marketing strategy and screwing over their VARs.

Ironic that the nickname for their best product was called "red box" - it's certainly been mostly "red" on their P&L page.

And no one is "ganging up" on Judy. Her product/site makes some pretty big claims with no real details to back them up. The tech world is dog eat dog (or perhaps "put up or shut up" is a better saying in this case). Judy's doing ok - she hasn't wilted from this thread, so there's some steel behind those rah rah's.

I'm guessing

you know, I shouldn't have bothered to reply.

Big Bear

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Purism’s next product could be a smartphone that runs Linux/free software

Purism is a company that’s been developing laptops and tablets that run Linux-based, free and open source software for a few years. Now Purism is considering building a smartphone and the company is soliciting feedback from potential customers. The idea would be to release a Librem Phone that runs GNU/Linux rather than Android, and which offers security and privacy features to help set it apart from most other phones on the market. Read more

Cinnamon 3.2 in Linux Mint 18.1 Supports Vertical Panels, Better Accelerometers

After informing the community a few days ago about the Mintbox Mini Pro PC and the upcoming improvements and new features shipping with the XApps software projects in Linux Mint 18.1, Clement Lefebvre just published the monthly Linux Mint newsletter. Read more

Blender 2.78 Open-Source 3D Graphics Software Released with Spherical Stereo VR

Today, September 30, 2016, the Blender Foundation is proud to release Blender 2.78, the latest stable and most advanced version of the popular, open-source, free, and cross-platform Blender 3D modelling software. Blender 2.78 comes six months after the release of Blender 2.77, and it's a major update that adds numerous new features and improvements, among which we can mention rendering of spherical stereo images for VR (Virtual Reality), viewport rendering improvements, as well as brand new freehand curves drawing over surfaces. Moreover, the Grease Pencil received awesome improvements and it now doubles as both an animation and drawing tool, powerful new options have been added for B-Bones, it's now possible to import and export basic operators in the Alembic support, and the Cloth Physics feature received new Simulation Speed option and Dynamic Base Mesh support. Read more

OSS Leftovers

  • Tools for writing the next best seller
    I am using bibisco in conjunction with LibreOffice on my Ubuntu 16.04 Asus laptop that I converted over from Windows 7 to develop my characters, scenes, and plot. I tried Manuskript, but find that I like bibisco better, although the results are similar. For one, it gives helpful prompts.
  • GNOME Calendar App to Feature a New Sidebar, Week View & Attendees in GNOME 3.24
    GNOME developer Georges Stavracas wrote an in-depth blog post the other day to inform the GNOME, Linux, and Open Source communities about the upcoming improvements and new features coming to the GNOME Calendar apps. Now that some of us are already enjoying the recently released GNOME 3.22 desktop environment, the GNOME developers are hard at work to improve the GNOME apps and core components by either adding new exciting features and technologies or improving existing ones.
  • PHP version 5.6.27RC1 and 7.0.12RC1
  • Kubernetes Arrives in New Flavors
    Kubernetes has taken center stage in recent days, and, as we’ve been noting in recent posts, the open source container cluster manager is heading in new directions. Google has just announced the release of Kubernetes 1.4, which makes the tool much easier to install. Meanwhile, Canonical has now launched its own distribution of Kubernetes, with enterprise support, across a range of public clouds and private infrastructure. It's Kubernetes at the core, but features a number of extra bells and whistles.
  • 2016 Women in Open Source Award Winners
    We hope you enjoy and are inspired by this short video celebrating Preeti Murthy and Jessica McKellar, the winners of this year’s Red Hat Women in Open Source Awards.
  • Tech, talent and tools: The secret to monetizing open-source
    “In California during the gold rush, you didn’t make money digging for gold; you made money selling shovels,” said Mehta. A fitting metaphor for the idea that investing in talent and tools, especially tools, is how to turn a profit. The actual data, databases, algorithms and so on would be open source. Money would come from the tools to use that technology to benefit specific areas, such as automation of healthcare. And healthcare is a good place to start. “Big Data is all about making life cheaper, better. … If we forget about how to solve problems for humans, we’ve lost. We want to be known for enriching life,” said Mehta.
  • Changing the way we design for the web
    On the one hand, open source should mean lower cost of entry for people from poorer communities (like me, growing up). But on the other, I feel it is hard to contribute when under- or unemployed. I had a grant to work on the Web Animations API documentation, but I can't do as much as I'd like with other animation features (motion paths, advanced timing functions) because I need to spend a lot of time working on my own business, getting paid. Essentially this leads to an awkward model where the only contributors are employed programmers—and when it comes to open source animation or design APIs, platforms, etc, this lack of user input really starts to show. Or, the only products with thriving open source development teams are those that have financially lucrative futures, turning the open source software (OSS) model into a capitalist one.
  • Leaders in Data Management and Open Source Innovation to Gather for Postgres Vision 2016
  • CloudReady by neverware
    I thought I would put together a quick “installation” review of a product called CloudReady by neverware. What is CloudReady? CloudReady is basically a project to bring Chromium OS to those who would like to convert traditional laptops into Chromebook-like devices. I stumbled on them several months ago and finally decided to see how hard it was to install Chromium OS and how functional it actually was as a Chromebook-like device. I have a few low end (netbook-like) devices and I have been trying to figure out how I could make them functional for my boys, I thought this might be the solution.
  • Mozilla tells Firefox OS devs to fork off if they want to chase open web apps vision
    The Mozilla Foundation's Firefox development team has decided enough is enough and will stop supporting Windows XP and Vista in March 2017 and also bin Firefox OS. The OS first. In this post Mozillans Ari Jaaksi and David Bryant, respectively the head of connected devices and veep for platform engineering, write that “By the end of 2015 Mozilla leadership had come to the conclusion that our then Firefox OS initiative of shipping phones with commercial partners would not bring Mozilla the returns we sought.” That decision means that “as of the end of July 2016 have stopped all commercial development on Firefox OS.”
  • Cloudera Delivers Release Built on Apache Spark 2.0, and Advances Kudu
    Cloudera, focused on Apache Hadoop and other open source technologies,has announced its release built on the Apache Spark 2.0 (Beta), with enhancements to the API experience, performance improvements, and enhanced machine learning capabilities. The company is also working with the community to continue developing Apache Kudu 1.0, recently released by the Apache Software Foundation, which we covered here. Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. Taken together, Cloudera's new tools are giving it more diverse kinds of presence on the Big Data scene. Cloudera claims it was the first Hadoop big data analytics vendor to deliver a commercially supported version of Spark, and has participated actively in the open source community to enhance Spark for the enterprise through its One Platform Initiative. "With Spark 2.0, organizations are better able to take advantage of streaming data, develop richer machine learning models, and deploy them in real time, enabling more workloads to go into production," the company reports.
  • Cloudera Delivers Enterprise-Grade Real-Time Streaming and Machine Learning with Apache Spark 2.0 and Drives Community Innovation with Apache Kudu 1.0
  • INSIDE Secure and Marvell Deliver Open Source Open Data Plane Security VPN Solution [Ed: “open source Open Data Plane (ODP) security API” sounds like nonsensical openwashing]
    INSIDE Secure (Paris:INSD), at the heart of security solutions for mobile and connected devices and network equipment, today announced the Marvell-INSIDE Secure solution, a collaboration that provides open source Open Data Plane (ODP) security API support on Marvell’s ARMADA® 8K and ARMADA 7K System-on-Chip (SoC) families with embedded INSIDE Secure Security Protocol Accelerator IP technology. The Marvell-INSIDE Secure solution provides customers with an easy and efficient way to secure their high-speed networking applications with access to all of the ARM ecosystem’s software support.
  • GE, Bosch Combine Resources to Bolster IoT
  • OpenBSD 6.0 Limited Edition CD set (signed by developers)
    Five OpenBSD 6.0 CD-ROM copies were signed by 40 developers during the g2k16 Hackathon in Cambridge, UK. Those copies are being auctioned sequentially on ebay. All proceeds will be donated to the OpenBSD Foundation to support and further the development of free software based on the OpenBSD operating system.
  • Friday Working together for Free Software Directory IRC meetup: September 30th
  • Machine Learning with Python
    I first heard the term “machine learning” a few years ago, and to be honest, I basically ignored it that time. I knew that it was a powerful technique, and I knew that it was in vogue, but I didn’t know what it really was— what problems it was designed to solve, how it solved them and how it related to the other sorts of issues I was working on in my professional (consulting) life and in my graduate-school research. But in the past few years, machine learning has become a topic that most will avoid at their professional peril. Despite the scary-sounding name, the ideas behind machine learning aren’t that difficult to understand. Moreover, a great deal of open-source software makes it possible for anyone to use machine learning in their own work or research. I don’t think it’s an overstatement to say that machine learning already is having a huge impact on the computer industry and on our day-to-day lives.