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CloudLinux OS Set to Surface At Parallels Summit

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Linux

The VAR Guy is booked to meet software giants and disruptive upstarts at Parallels Summit 2010 in Miami. Among the anticipated meetings: A sit-down with Cloud Linux Inc. founder and CEO Igor Seletskiy. The big question: Does the hosting world really need yet another Linux distribution? Seletskiy and Cloud Linux certainly seem to think so. Here’s why.

During a Feb. 23 keynote, Seletskiy is expected to describe how hosting service providers can leverage CloudLinux to maintain balance between number of users per server and the load the server can carry. The Parallels event is expected to mark the first time Seletskiy takes the stage to talk about the CloudLinux OS.

Launched in 2009 and based in Princeton, N.J., Cloud Linux claims the company’s CloudLinux OS is the “only Linux–based, commercially supported operating system (OS) optimized for shared hosting providers and datacenters.”

Hmmm… The VAR Guy is skeptical




I can't wait for your sit down with CloudLinux

So Mr. VAR Guy --

The more skeptical you are -- the sweeter it will be when you learn why CloudLinux really does rock.

Igor, the CEO, has been in this space for over a dozen years and the problem he solved was bugging him "for 3 years". Can't wait to hear your reaction after your sit down.

Don't worry - I won't say "I told you so".

Respectfully,
Judy, Chief CloudLinux Cheerleader, Shapiro Smile

P.S. - I hope are enjoying the Miami sun while we freeze up here in the Northeast.

re: Skeptical

Perhaps if your web site was more substance then fluff, people wouldn't be so skeptical.

And maybe fix the broken links???

Example...
http://www.cloudlinux.com/company/news/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=210

The "more..." link is malformed - lose the extra http// in the link.

Things like that make it hard to believe your other claims.

It will be interesting to see what the VAR GUY reports back.

Judy Shapiro

Hi vonskippy - Thanks for the link fix. Our focus is on creating meaty solutions -- not websites Smile

But your point is well taken and we appreciate the feedback. Thanks.

Judy Shapiro

re: Meaty solutions

Many startups, to their later dismay, woeful under estimate the importance of a good website.

I think your glib "Our focus is on creating meaty solutions - not websites" indicates you're one of them.

Your "meaty solutions" are DIRECTLY tied to the Internet, so I find your lack of concern disturbing. If you don't care about your web image - why should I care about your product?

Fine, maybe you have a killer sales force - but why piss away the fringe clients that come across your product thru side channels? Their first (and probably last) step will be looking to your website for real information - something that is practically nonexistent on your current site.

Except for lots of marketing buzz words - what proof do you offer on your website that your product does anything at all. White papers - nope that link is empty. Detailed analysis of your product vs others - nope again, still just vaporous marketspeak.

You seem to be taking your cheerleader title just a tad too literal. Less rah rah and more real info is what it takes to launch a new product (unless of course you have great pom poms, then maybe you could do both).

You might indeed have the next greatest thing since sliced meat byproducts, but you're certainly not convincing anyone serious to take a second look.

White paper coming

Hi again -

Whoa - it's not that we don't take it all seriously -- it's just launching a new company requires a disciplined, priority approach where some things take precedence over others.

As to your real point -- where's the meaty data - at the Parallel show, the CEO of CloudLinux is presenting the results of a web server study which describes the challenges of creating a well balanced, yet optimized web server. A white paper detailing the study and how CloudLinux addresses these issues is due to be up on the site within the next 10 days. Your demand to get better info on the site is fair and that activity is already underway, e.g. case studies.

Please accept my overenthusiastic cheerleader stance for what it - my excitement that as such a new company we were able to get 6 partners signed up in 30 days. I did not mean my excitement to be confused for flippancy. It was not intended.

But in the end, it is the product that should do all the talking - certainly not me. That's what really counts as I am sure you would agree. So I hope you do take a second look since I claim no great talent at poms poms Smile

Judy Shapiro

ever heard of a little known company called Novell?

You may have, it's the biggest company out there with the smallest and worst marketing department ever, and it hasn't fixed that marketing dept in over 15 years .

Novell, I have always thought, produces great products but never gets them to the public correctly because their focus has been on the "meaty solutions" as well.

Because they consistently fail to market themselves and their product correctly or successfully, they are a perennial underdog, coming from behind.

VonSkippy has a point in that no matter how great your product is, if you don't make it accessible, and I hate to say it, but "exciting" to the drubs of the media industry, it won't be seen as the great solution you want it to be, if it is seen at all.

Take a lesson from Novell and pay attention to the details of your marketing.

Big Bear

re: Novell

Novell shafted their VAR's and shot themselves in the foot time and time again.

Novell wanted their VAR's to pick up the table scrapes, and wanted their in-house sales force to get the cherry (i.e. read "big") accounts, even if that meant stealing those big accounts directly from their VARs.

After the third or fourth time of doing that, and then backpedaling saying it was all just a big misunderstanding and it wouldn't happen again, any VAR with a brain jumped ship faster then Lindsay Lohan fills up barf bags.

Novell is absolutely clueless on how to market their product or run their company. They had the de facto BEST networking software ever - and pissed that away and let Microsoft completely steal that market away from them, by fumble finger handling their marketing strategy and screwing over their VARs.

Ironic that the nickname for their best product was called "red box" - it's certainly been mostly "red" on their P&L page.

And no one is "ganging up" on Judy. Her product/site makes some pretty big claims with no real details to back them up. The tech world is dog eat dog (or perhaps "put up or shut up" is a better saying in this case). Judy's doing ok - she hasn't wilted from this thread, so there's some steel behind those rah rah's.

I'm guessing

you know, I shouldn't have bothered to reply.

Big Bear

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