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What's wrong with Gentoo, anyway?

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Gentoo

Yesterday I snapped and declared my intent to resign from Gentoo. Why did that happen? Well, it’s a huge mix of problems, all joined together by one common factor: no matter how much work I pour into getting Gentoo working like it should be, more problems are generated by sloppy work from at least one or two developers.

I’m not referring about the misunderstandings about QA rules, which happens and are naturally caused by the fact we’re humans and not being of pure logic (luckily! how boring it would be otherwise, to always behave in the most logical way!). Those can upset me but they are still after all no big deals. What I’m referring to is the situation where one or two developers can screw up the whole tree without anybody being (reasonably) able to do a thing about it. We’ve had to two (different) examples in the past few months, and while both have undeniably bothered QA, users, and developers alike, no action has been taken in any of these cases.

We thus have developer A, who decided that it’s a good idea to force all users to have Python 3 installed on their systems, because upstream released it (even when upstream consider it still experimental, something to toy with), and who kept on ignoring calls for dropping that from both users and developers (luckily, the arch teams are not mindless drones, and wouldn’t let this slide to stable as he intended in the first place). The same developer also hasn’t been able to properly address one slight problem with the new wrapper after months from the unleashing of that to the unstable users (unstable does not mean unusable).

Then we have developer B who feels like the tree’s saviour, the only person who can make Gentoo bleeding edge again… while most of if not all of the rest the developer pool is working on getting Gentoo more stable and more maintainable.

Of the two, I was first upset most by the former, but on the long run, the latter is the one who drove me mad.




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