Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

ASUS' Xonar STX Gains Even More Functionality Under Linux

Filed under
Hardware

Ever since ASUS first released its Xonar line-up of cards, I knew I had to have one. But, being that I use Linux as a primary OS, I knew that the chance of me finding good support was slim. Well, that support may have taken a couple of months in the beginning to come to fruition, but since then, the open-sourced ALSA drivers have come to support every Xonar model available, along with many of their specific features.

This past fall, I "upgraded" my Xonar D2X to an Essence STX (I use quotes because both cards are about equal in their awesomeness), and as I expected, the card worked just fine under Linux. One issue I did mention, though, was that the volume on the STX could reach levels impossible on the D2X... dangerous levels. Because this card is designed for headphones, it has a built-in amp, and I assumed the loudness was due to what was essentially the amp being set to max power by default.

Aside from that issue, though, the card offered an expected range of controls for both input and output, so all was well. Compared to Windows, I can't find a real fault with the Linux driver.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Screenshots

Quad-core media player runs Kodi/XBMC on OpenElec Linux

SolidRun’s tiny, $100 “CuBoxTV” media player runs OpenElec Linux and Kodi (formerly XBMC) on a quad-core i.MX6 SoC, and offers 100Mbps+ video decoding. The CuBoxTV is the first Freescale i.MX6 based media player to run the Kodi (formerly XBMC) multimedia distribution, says Israel-based SolidRun. CuBoxTV is closely based on the company’s latest i.MX6 based CuBox mini-PC, which now sells for $80 to $140, depending on the number of Cortex-A9 i.MX6 cores and other features. The CuBoxTV, which is available only with the quad-core i.MX6 SoC, goes for a sale price of $100. Read more

Canonical Is Still Considering Turning the Phone into a Mini-PC

Canonical is working to complete their idea of convergence with the launch of Ubuntu Touch, a new operating system for mobile devices. The desktop flavor of Ubuntu will eventually share the same code with the mobile one, and their plans go even further than that. Read more