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gFTP: The No-Hassle Way to Transfer Files

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Software

I am an avid user of open source software and a firm believer in the benefits of FOSS. I have a choice of operating systems at my disposal, but I now cringe whenever I have to work in the Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) world. I much prefer the vast array of Linux apps. Why? They are bloat-free problem solvers. Take, for example, the gFTP File Client.

I stumbled upon the gFTP app quite by accident. I was having difficulty uploading audio and graphic files as attachments to a corporate email account in the cloud. The task was worsened by uncooperative technologies. Working remotely, which is typical for writers, I used my ISP to tether to the Internet from my home office.

The email server imposes a limit on the size of attachments, but the corporate email server had plenty of cloud space, so no limit existed on the receiving end.

It should have have been no contest to bypass the email attachments by uploading the large files to the corporate FTP (File Transfer Protocol) servers. That's where the problem worsened.

Rest Here




eh, I'll take Dolphin

As nice as a FTP-specific app can be on a Windows box, within GNU/Linux I'd rather use the KDE built-in "KIO slaves" which allow access via pretty much EVERY KDE application, by putting in the location bar your protocol and server info:
> ftp://www.domain.com
> sftp://www.domain.com
> imap://mail.domain.com
> http://www.domain.com

Yep, they all follow a pattern, but only the last one is known outside of GNU/Linux it seems. Shame. I am awaiting the day Dolphin and these KIO Slaves run well on Windows, especially from PortableApps.com

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