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My New Linux Laptop

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A couple of weeks ago, my wife bought an Asus netbook. It came with Win 7 Starter Edition. Okay, I gave up long ago trying to convert her to Linux. What made ME happy was when she said I could have her old laptop once I backed up all her documents, music, etc. that she had on it.

She knew what I was going to do with it. After all, both desktop systems in the house are running up-to-date PCLinuxOS 2009. She found she prefers a laptop system so she doesn’t have to go down to the computer room to get online; she can just sit down, put her feet up where ever she wants, and connect. She also knew I would like a laptop, too, if only so I could be in the same room with her.

But now I was faced with a decision. I wanted to put KDE4 on the laptop. I knew PCLinuxOS would run, because I’d used the live-CD occasionally over the last few months. But that would mean installing the 2009.2 iso, then going through hours of updates and changes just to get KDE4 up and running. I really wanted to put the 2010 iso on, but it hasn’t been released to the public, yet. So I started checking around. OpenSuse? Nah, that one always felt bloated and slow to me. Kubuntu? Definitely not. In my opinion, one of the worst implementation of KDE4 I’ve ever seen. My experiment with it last year left me very disillusioned. Fedora? No, too “cutting edge”. I want a system that “just works”.

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