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Microsoft’s Toyota Letter

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Microsoft

Hearing about the Toyota recall and extent to which the company has gone towards compensating Toyota owners makes me wonder what would happen if software manufacturers had to live up to the standards placed on car companies?

Imagine, the letter from Microsoft, for that matter, addressing Windows operators (as the PC Guy attempts to shrug off the consolation of his Mac counterpart):

Dear Loyal Windows User (they hope!),

Microsoft (MSFT), Inc., has received recent information about repeated customer complaints revolving around the Windows Operating System, which all state that the software causes computer complications, which may result in reduced efficiency and communication problems between computers and external plug-ins (i.e. printers, internets, etcetera). Upon receiving this information, Microsoft immediately went to work to evaluate the situation and interview a selection of the individuals who have filed complaints.

rest here




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