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Moonlight's Olympic-sized failure

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Software

Every couple of years, Microsoft and its partners get to show off what the technology is capable of and push the limits of live video coverage. This year, the plethora of Canadian channels covering the Olympics were all available live from one website, and the experience was terrific.

Unless you were using Linux that is.

As history shows, Microsoft only produces the Silverlight runtime for Windows and OS X, leaving Linux support to Novell's Mono project, which produces Moonlight. Mono developers argue that Mono is not chasing tail lights, but in the case of Moonlight it very clearly is.

The Olympics player made use of Silverlight 3.0, which was available from mid-2009. Moonlight on the other hand is only stable up to Silverlight 2 (first released in late 2008) and only offers Silverlight 3 support as a 3.0 preview release.

Moonlight 2 users were prompted to install the 3.0 preview release when attempting to view a stream,

but all was not well.




NBC in the USA had their own failure.

In the USA, NBC Television had an Olympic-sized failure when I wasn't allowed to watch the live nor previously-recorded footage, at all, without also having some sort of Premium Provider account (such as Cable TV or Satellite TV account), which was required (!) for login (with that account) before I could see any footage.

NCB, you're an OVER-THE-AIR broadcast company. Due to not having a Premium provider, you are one of the FOUR CHANNELS that my televisions receive, meaning you get my eyeballs much more than any other channel. Yet I need to pay someone else to see your footage?

Fail.

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