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Interview: CrunchBang Creator Explains Switch to Debian Sources

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MY fondness for CrunchBang Linux is well documented, so when the release of the first alpha version of the next generation of this fine UK-based distribution was announced I was excited, to say the least.

Regulars on the CrunchBang forum have known for some time that distro leader Philip Newborough was considering ending his creation's Ubuntu foundations, moving instead to being built from Debian.

As a Debian fan I'm excited by this change, but I wanted to know a little more about what motivated Philip to make the switch... so I asked him. What follows are my questions, followed by his unedited answers.

RD: What is it about Debian Squeeze that you prefer over the latest Ubuntu?

PN: For myself, it is not really a question of what it is about the Debian Squeeze release in particular, but more a question about the different approaches taken by the Debian and Ubuntu projects. Unlike the Ubuntu project, Debian does not have a commercial sponsor with any commercial interests. This was never an issue for myself, until recently when Canonical seem to have become less of a sponsor and more of a governing party; I know this is debatable, but I believe that some of their recent decisions might not necessarily have been made with the best interest of their users/community at heart.

From a less political perspective, the Ubuntu project is geared towards producing a polished end-user system. The Ubuntu developers make changes to Debian packages to achieve this goal. These changes often cause problems for derivative projects such CrunchBang. Therefore, the obvious thing to do to negate these problems was to make the switch to Debian.

rest here

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